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              De La Salle College Macroom

School Plan

Mission Statement

 

“Our community aims to assist our pupils to develop their full potential in a Christian environment. In our school this vision will be achieved by mutual respect and co-operation amongst all partners in an open, safe and caring environment”.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Section 1- General school details:

History

De La Salle College Macroom is a catholic voluntary secondary school dedicated to maintaining the spiritual and educational values of Jean Baptiste de la Salle, the Patron Saint of teachers and founder of the De la Salle order. Even though the brothers no longer have an active role in the school, we remain committed to achievement in the academic, sporting and development spheres of life as begun by them in Macroom in 1933. The order relinquished control in 1991, however the school remains part of the De la Salle family of schools.

Currently the school caters for 320 students which include a number of students with special needs as well as students whose native language is not English.

The location of the school, in a quiet area away from the noise and bustle of the streets, leads to an atmosphere of peace and tranquillity that is conducive to effective learning.

Personnel

Board of Management: 

Canon Donal Roberts      
Mr. Noel Dunne      
Mrs.Anne  O’Dwyer
Mrs.Christine Kelleher    
Mr. Liam Long  
Mr. Liam Fleming
Mr.Danny Relihan    
Mr.Pat Goold              
Mr.John Murphy

                                             

Patron: 

Bishop William Crean

 

Members:

Staff:

Mr.John Murphy    
Ms.Nicola Crowley                  
Ms.Evelyn O’Shea
Mr.Eric Graham
Ms.Siobhan Angland                    
Mr.Shane Ryan          
Mr. Pat Walsh                                                    
Mr.John Ryan
Ms. Sorcha Nagle
Ms.Mary O’Connor
Mr.Liam Fleming                    
Mr. Loic labat
Ms.Judy Kenneally                      
Ms.Eva Dunne                              
 
Mr.Pat Goold                          
Mr.Liam Long                                  
 
Ms.Helen O’Sullivan
Mrs.Catriona O’Brien            
 
Mr.Declan Murphy                
Mr. Conor Kinsella
 
Ms.Mary McSweeney
Ms.Kathy Hinchion                
 
Mr.Fergus Ryan                            
Mr.Jack Cott                                  
 
Ms.Jean O’Donovan (career break)
Mr.Con Lynch
 
Ms.Geraldine O’Shea                  
Mr.Daniel McCarthy              
 

                    

School Chaplin:

Fr. Joe O’Mahony

 

Special Needs Assistants:

Ms.Jonette Kearney                                    
Mr.Stephen Quinn      
Mr.Edmond Morey
Mr.Chris Lynch                                              
Mrs.Eileen Lane

 

Canteen Staff:

Mrs.Mary O’Callaghan                                
Mrs.Mary O’Connell

 

 

School Secretary:

Mrs.Sheila O’Leary

 

 

Caretaking and Maintenance:

Mr.Declan Coughlan                                    
Mr.Jack Coleman                                          
Mr. Aidan Coughlan
Ms. Monica Zajac
Mrs.Iwona Juszczak

Senior and Middle Management:

Principal
Mr.John Murphy
Deputy Principal
Mr.Eric Graham
Assistant Principals (1)
 
Mr.Pat Walsh                                                
Ms.Mary O’Connor    
Mr.Fergus Ryan
Mr. Conor Kinsella
Assistant Principals (2)
Mr. Daniel McCarthy
Ms. Kathy Hinchion
Mr. Pat Gould
Mr. Jack Cott  
Ms. Judy Kenneally
Transition Year Coordinator
Mr. John Ryan

 

 

 

Parents Association:

 

Formed in 1992 and is affiliated to the CSSPA. The school has an active Parents Association which provides information evenings for parents, engages in school policy development as well as assisting with fund-raising activities.

 

 

 

 

Subjects:

Junior Cycle:

Irish      
English
Maths
Business Studies                            
C.S.P.E.                                              
French
Geography
History
P.E.
Religious Education                    
Science                                              
S.P.H.E.
Music (after school-optional)      
Art ( after school-optional)    
Technology
Technical Graphics                      
Wellbeing
Career Guidance

            

Classes are of mixed ability in first year. In second year based on performance indicators students may be separated into higher and ordinary level classes in  Irish, English and Maths.

First year students study Technical Graphics for one half of the year and then switch to Technology for the remainder of the year. At the beginning of second year, based on performance and student preference the students study one of these subjects to the Junior Cert exam.

 

Senior Cycle Subjects:

All students take Irish, English, Mathematics and Religious Education plus four more from the following list:

Accounting
Biology                                              
Business
Chemistry
French                                              
Geography
History
Physics
Technology

                                              

Other subjects that may be offered on an optional, after-hours basis include:

Agricultural Science                  
Art
Economics
Applied Maths                          
Music
Design and Communication Graphics

                         

Some students also take on an additional module known as the Leaving Cert Vocational Programme (L. C. V. P). This module is based on self-directed learning, enterprise, work and the community. Assessment takes the form of a portfolio presentation and exam. The module counts for points towards third level entry.

 

 

Opening and closing times:

8.00am: School Opens

9.00am: Morning assembly

9.00am: Classes begin

11.00: Small break

11.15: Classes resume

1.15pm: Lunch break

1.50pm: Classes resume

3.50pm: Classes end

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Books:

Text Books used at Junior Certificate:

Subject
1styear
2nd year
3rd year
Irish
"Turas 1" - Gill & Macmillan
Aois na Glóire 3   Gill & Macmillan
  • Aois na Glóire 3 (Honours)  
               Gill & Macmillan                          
  • "Seoid" for 3rd higher & ordinary level
  • Less Stress More Success   (Ordinary Level)-   
  • Gill & Macmillan
  •   Aois na Glóire 2 (Ordinary Level)  - Gill & Macmillan
 
French
Allons y 1( educate.ie)
Bienvue en France 2
Bienvue en France 2
History
Uncovering History
Delap, Seán and Paul McCormack,  Folens.
Uncovering History
Delap, Seán and Paul McCormack,  Folens.
Uncovering History
Delap, Seán and Paul McCormack,  Folens.
S.P.H.E
My Life : Stephanie Mangan
 
My Life : Stephanie Mangan
 
My Life : Stephanie Mangan
 
C.S.P.E
Make A Difference, Harrison and Wilson
Make A Difference, Harrison and Wilson
Make A Difference, Harrison and Wilson
Technology
 
Teacher notes
Teacher notes
Teacher notes
Technical Graphics
 
Text and Activities : Philip O’Callaghan
 
Text and Activities : Philip O’Callaghan
 
Text and Activities : Philip O’Callaghan
 
Religion
Religion for Living: Connie Duffy
Religion for Living: Connie Duffy
Religion for Living: Connie Duffy
Maths
Concise Maths 1
  • Concise maths 2 (Higher level)
  • Concise maths 1 (Ordinary level)
  • Concise maths 2 (Higher level)
  • Concise maths 1 (Ordinary level)
English
Step Up Folens
  • Make your Mark Folens
  • Romeo and Juliet
  • To Kill a Mockingbird
  • Remainder to be decided (1 play and 1 novel)
  • Quest
  • Romeo and Juliet
  • To Kill a Mockingbird
 
Career Guidance
Learning to Learn
Learning to learn
Learning to learn
Business
Business Studies for households and enterprises
Business Studies for households and enterprises
Business Studies for households and enterprises
Geography
Geography now, New Junior Cycle (Edco)
Geography now, New Junior Cycle (Edco)
Geography now, New Junior Cycle (Edco)
Science
Exploring Science : Michael O’Callaghan, Seamus Reily & Aidan Geary
Exploring Science : Michael O’Callaghan, Seamus Reily & Aidan Geary
Exploring Science : Michael O’Callaghan, Seamus Reily & Aidan Geary

 

Text Books used at Senior Cycle:

Subject
4th year
5th year
6th year
Irish
  • Gaelsaol – Mentor
  • "A Thig ná Tit Orm"- Le Maidhc Dainín O Sé
  • "Fuinneamh" (Ordinary Level)-Edco
 
  • 5th year-higher level - fiuntas nua
  • 5th year ordinary level -fuinneamh nua
  •  
  • Fuinneamh  (Ordinary Level)- Edco
  • Fiúntas ( Honours) – Edco
  • "A Thig ná Tit Orm"- Le Maidhc Dainín O Sé
  •  
French
Tout va Bien
Tout va Bien
Tout va Bien
Accounting
Accounting for senior cycle : Christy Tyrell & David Kielthy
 
Accounting for senior cycle : Christy Tyrell & David Kielthy
 
Accounting for senior cycle : Christy Tyrell & David Kielthy
 
History
  • Lucey, Dermot, Modern Europe and the Wider World, Gill and Macmillan
  • Brockie, Gerard and Raymond Walsh, Modern Ireland, Gill and Macmillan
 
  • Lucey, Dermot, Modern Europe and the Wider World, Gill and Macmillan
  • Brockie, Gerard and Raymond Walsh, Modern Ireland, Gill and Macmillan
 
  • Lucey, Dermot, Modern Europe and the Wider World, Gill and Macmillan
  • Brockie, Gerard and Raymond Walsh, Modern Ireland, Gill and Macmillan
 
Technology
Teacher notes
Teacher notes
Teacher notes
Religion
Seek and Find : Broderick, Costelloe, O’Regan and Travers.
 
Seek and Find : Broderick, Costelloe, O’Regan and Travers.
 
Seek and Find : Broderick, Costelloe, O’Regan and Travers.
 
Maths
  • 4th Higher Level Active Maths 4, book 1 and 2. Folens
  • 4th Ordinary Level Active Maths 3. Folens
  • 5th and 6th Higher Level Text and Tests 4 – 7 : O.D.Morris
  • 5th and 6th Ordinary Level Text and Text 3
  • 5th and 6th Higher Level Text and Tests 4 – 7 : O.D.Morris
  • 5th and 6th Ordinary Level Text and Text 3
Physics
Real World Physics : Dan O’Regan
Real World Physics : Dan O’Regan
Real World Physics : Dan O’Regan
English
The Spinning Heart by Donal Ryan
  • Hamlet Edco
  • Foster by Claire Keegan
  • The Plough and the Stars
  • New Discovery Edco
  • Ordinary Level Big Maggie
  • Signs (Poetry Book)
  • New Discovery Edco
  • King Lear
  • Foster by Claire Keegan
  • The Plough and the Stars
Business
21st Century Business
21st Century Business
21st Century Business
Chemistry
Teacher notes
Teacher notes
Teacher notes
Geography
  • Todays World : Liam Ashe and Kieran McCarthy
  • Our Dynamic World : Barry Brunt
  • Model answers/ A theamatic approach : Eleanor Solan
  • Todays World : Liam Ashe and Kieran McCarthy
  • Our Dynamic World : Barry Brunt
  • Model answers/ A theamatic approach : Eleanor Solan
  • Todays World : Liam Ashe and Kieran McCarthy
  • Our Dynamic World : Barry Brunt
  • Model answers/ A theamatic approach : Eleanor Solan
Biology
Leaving Cert Biology : Michael O’Cllaghan
Leaving Cert Biology : Michael O’Cllaghan
Leaving Cert Biology : Michael O’Cllaghan

 

 

Uniform:

The uniform consists of a blue shirt, school jumper with crest and grey trousers.

Extra-curricular activities:

Sport:

Gaelic games form the main sport of the school, and we have achieved many great triumphs on both the football and hurling fields. The most significant of these, undoubtedly, was our victory in the Corn Ui Mhuiri in 2006. This is the highest honour that can be achieved in Munster Colleges Senior football, and is the trophy that is most coveted by every sporting school in the province. This achievement represents the “icing on the cake” in a roll of Honour that includes many successes in all age groups in both Munster and Cork competitions. Many of our past pupils have graced the senior inter-county scene, and in the very recent past several of our students have been selected on the Cork minor football team. In recent years Hurling has thrived in the school and we now have teams in every age group and have also had considerable success in these competitions.

The college has a proud tradition in athletics, with many successes in both track and field and cross-country events. Recently one of our past pupils has represented Ireland in athletics in the London Olympics in 2012. The school has also excelled in other sports down through the years e.g. basketball, golf and table tennis. First years compete for the annual Mark Duggan Memorial cup in soccer.

Quizzes:

The college has formed a name for itself in the world of inter-school quizzes, both from the point of view of participation and success. Some of these successes include:

Pfizer Leaving Cert Chemistry quiz (twice)

Cork History Teachers Associations JC History Quiz 2015 and 2016

Irish Examiner General Knowledge quiz

Munster Colleges Senior Science quiz

Cork Schools’ Junior cert Science quiz

Cork Schools’ Business quiz

West Cork schools’ Maths quiz

In the recent past a Leaving Cert student of the school ,Colm Kelleher, was selected to represent Ireland in the World Physics Olympiad, which was held in South Korea.

 

 

Drama and Debating:

The school has had significant success in drama and debating competitions, including wins in the Cork schools’ Shakespearean drama competition (three times) and in the Muskerry schools’ senior debating contest. In the recent past our students have put on some marvellous stage productions, e.g. “The Hobbit”, a panto based on the Muppets’ version of “ A Christmas Carol”, and a musical adaptation of “ Treasure Island”. The school has also excelled in the All-Ireland Transition Year drama competition.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Section 2-Vision/Mission statement:

The mission of a Lasallian Centre is to give a Human and Christian Education to the young, with special concern for the disadvantaged. Each School is a Community where the different groups associated with it work together in close partnership for the mutual benefit of all partners.

 

The Lasallian School:

In keeping with the philosophy and vision of its founder, the Lasallian School:

  • Is a Christian Community which shares the mission of the Catholic Church, by committing itself to live by Gospel values.
  • Has as its main aims the spiritual formation, academic preparation and cultural development of its pupils.
  • Is characterised by the emphasis which it gives to the education of children who are disadvantaged.
  • Renews and updates itself in order to respond effectively to the social and religious challenges of today.

The Lasallian School creates an environment which:

  • Recognises and respects the dignity of each individual.
  • Fosters attitudes of tolerance, care, concern for justice and of service to others.
  • Has an agreed code of discipline in place, is well managed, cultivates a welcoming, happy atmosphere and an environment conducive to good learning.

 

 

 

The Lasallian School is a partnership composed of teachers, parents, students, management and other staff which:

  • Recognises the contribution which each partner group makes to the successful functioning of the school.
  • Encourages the co-operative participation of all partner groups, where appropriate, in the decision making process relating to the school.
  • Seeks to develop trust and understanding between the different groups, in order to create an atmosphere of peace and harmony to the benefit of all.
  • Contributes to the building up of the local community.

Staff:

Staff play a central role in ensuring the growth and development of the Lasallian Education Community.

Members of staff in the Lasallian Education Community commit themselves to building the community by dedicated, professional service of youth through education. The whole school community supports the Teaching Staff in this important work. This is achieved in a variety of ways by:

  • Good educational practice combined with openness to inservice and new developments.
  • An environment conducive to good teaching and the pursuit of excellence.
  • Respect and curtesy from the student body.
  • Support, encouragement and praise.
  • Good facilities and proper resourcing of subjects.
  • Partnership and cooperation.
  • A supportive, disciplined and diligent student body.

Staff take the necessary steps to keep abreast of modern educational trends by continuing their personal and professional development. They will be supported in this work of inservice by the Lasallian Education Community.

Partnership through cooperative participation with other members of the school community is reflected in a variety of structures which staff contribute to building and developing: Board of Management, Student Council, Parent Association and other school bodies and activities.

The Students:

At the heart of every Lasallian Education Community are its students.

The Board of Management, the Principal, Staff and Parents are generous and enthusiastic in their efforts on behalf of the young people in their care. Qualities that students will find in a Lasallian Education Community include:

  • A caring, friendly, supportive and safe environment.
  • Respect for and courtesy towards all.
  • Appreciation of their particular contribution.
  • Christian values which are given high priority in relation to how members of the community act and in relation to the suitability of the curriculum provided.
  • Opportunities for involvement, partnership and cooperation.
  • Authority that is fair and even handed in approach, listens, is open minded and encourages a progressive self-discipline.
  • a quality student-centred education that endeavours to prepare them for life.

The Lasallian Community encourages its students to contribute to contemporary society by being aware of its values and by learning to question these in a positive way. Students are involved in the promotion of justice and human dignity for all. Members of the local school community who are disadvantaged or marginalised are cherished and treated with sensitivity and care.

Participation in the building of the school community is a key role for all students. This is accomplished in a variety of ways:

  • Cooperating with the various groups that make up the school community, staff, students and parents.
  • Participating in school structures, Student Council, Prefects etc.
  • Learning to help one another and developing a spirit of loyalty by supporting school activities sporting and cultural.

The school community wishes students to develop a deep and genuine respect for each other, for their parents and members of staff. School is a special opportunity for students to develop their potential and to grow as people. Spiritual and intellectual growth are significant priorities. The furthering of social and personal skills is also seen as an important part of each students overall education. 

Parents:

Parents are the first and primary educators of their children.

Partnership between the school and the families of students must be continually strengthened. Catholic tradition teaches that God has bestowed on the family its own specific and unique educational mission. Close collaboration between the home and the school is necessary to ensure that students benefit fully from the formal education provided in the school. Therefore as members of the Lasallian Education Community parents are encouraged to:

  • Take an interest in the education of their children and cooperate with the school in all matters relating to education.
  • Assist their children in setting worthwhile and attainable academic goals for themselves.
  • Ensure that their children respect and observe the code of behaviour of the school.
  • Are available to their children to support and encourage them especially in times of need.
  • Encourage their children to respect their teachers and cooperate with them.
  • Maintain close communication links with the school.
  • Take part in any programmes which the school provides for the benefit of parents.
  • Supports any activities organised by their own, or other partner groups to promote the community of the school.

Management:

The role of Management is to help schools provide the best possible education for their pupils.

The school is under patronage of Bishop William Crean in the Diocese of Cloyne. The day to day management is delegated to the Principal of the school.

School management is always conscious of the obligation on Trustees to strive to ensure that the school remains true to its founding intention, to the mission of the original promoters and founders of the school.

Good communication and cooperation between all sectors of management are required so that in the appropriate exercise of their authority those responsible ensure that the school is administered to the highest possible standard:

  • The provision of good quality education is the schools central purpose.
  • The school staff is carefully chosen and given opportunity for professional development.
  • The learning environment and service to the students are constantly monitored and evaluated.
  • The school responds to the needs and expectations of the local community.
  • The property and finances of the school are protected and developed.

Management constantly evaluates its own performance in line with developments in education and regular board of management meetings are held.  

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Section 3-Curriculum Plans/Programmes:

Curriculum.

Subjects:

 

Junior Cert.

Irish      
English
Maths
Business Studies                            
C.S.P.E.                                              
French
Geography
History
P.E.
Religious Education                    
Science                                              
S.P.H.E.
Music (after school-optional)      
Art ( after school-optional)    
Technology
Technical Graphics                      
Wellbeing
Career Guidance

Classes are not streamed in first year.  In second year based on performance indicators, students may be separated into Higher and Ordinary level classes for some subjects.

First year students take Technical Graphics for one half of the year and then switch to Technology for the remainder of the year.  At the beginning of second year the students select one of these subjects to take to the Junior Cert exam. Performance indicators, such as their grades in the first year summer exams may be considered when classes are being formed in second year. 

Senior Cycle.

All students take Irish, English, Maths and Religious Education plus four from the following list.

Accounting
Biology                                              
Business
Chemistry
French                                              
Geography
History
Physics
Technology

Other subjects that may be offered on an optional, after school hours include;

Agricultural Science                  
Art
Economics
Applied Maths                          
Music
Design and Communication Graphics

Some students also take on an additional module LCVP.  Assessment takes the form of a portfolio assessment and a written exam.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Transition Year.

 

Transition year is compulsory in the college and was introduced in 1994 and serves as to bridge a gap between Junior and Leaving Certificate.  Activities during the year are geared towards broadening the students’ outlook and instilling a more reflective attitude towards himself and his environment.

Within each subject a certain amount of work is undertaken from the Leaving Cert. syllabi.  Other material is also presented that may or may not be directly related to the syllabus but which is designed to foster an interest in a broader range of the subject.

Students follow a similar timetable to all senior cycle students except on Friday afternoons where they engage in a variety of activities such as first aid and GAA coaching, self-defence, driver theory, drama, Golf, paintballing etc. All students undertake one week of work experience in December and another week in May. Students also have the opportunity to participate in outdoor pursuits and travel to Bordeaux as part of our language exchange programme.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Options, Structures and Levels

 

.

Senior Cycle subject choice:

 

This process begins in third year when the students are surveyed regarding their preferences for the following year. As each year group will have different needs and abilities the subject choices are reviewed annually with flexibility to change throughout all of fourth year. Students are free to change subjects throughout transition year and protocols are in place to ensure that the students, teachers, parents and the Guidance Councillor are involved in the decision making process.

All JC classes are provided with subject choice guidance and are surveyed as many times as is necessary to help fund the optimum level of student satisfaction with student choice. An information evening is held in May each year to ensure all parents are familiar with the choices and implications of selecting each subject so as to ensure informed decision making takes place amongst the relevant parties. 

 

 

Levels:

 

All subjects are taught at Higher level in the Junior cycle with the exception of English, Maths and Irish which are taught at higher level whenever possible until the beginning of 3rd year, and then split to provide an appropriate choice of level for each student. 

At Senior cycle all subjects are available as higher and ordinary level, primarily in a mixed classroom setting.  Foundation level Irish and Maths is undertaken by a small number of students when deemed appropriate after consultation with the Guidance Councillor.

 

 

Provision of Special Needs.

 

The provision of Special Needs is as comprehensive and inclusive as possible.  Assessment tests are held in mid December for all incoming first year students.  Contact is made with the Primary School principals, and if it is thought necessary, with parents to discuss any issues, academic or otherwise, that may be of concern.

In late January all parents of incoming first years are contacted and informal interviews take place with the Principal and Guidance Councillor. This gives both parents and student an opportunity to clarify any concerns as well as receiving a personalised tour of the school.

Later in April the incoming first years attend an activities morning. This facilitates the integration of students, especially those from some of the smaller National schools. This Saturday morning also allows parents to meet for coffee and scones which helps the post primary integration process.    

Application is then made for resource hours for students who have clearly defined needs.  The same procedure applies to students who enrol in other years.

There is a special induction course for first years on their first day.  Pupils are being monitored closely during September.  At the end of September parents have an opportunity to meet the Principal, Deputy Principal, Learning Support Teacher and Class teachers at an evening information session. Any individual problems that arise are discussed and arrangements made to provide suitable support if necessary.

The Learning Support teacher is in regular contact with parents and teachers.  The students progress is monitored regularly by means of class tests and end of term tests.

Every effort is made to make the provision as inclusive as possible and team teaching in the class setting is the preferred methodology whenever deemed the most appropriate. One to one or small group withdrawals from the classroom may also take place when deemed appropriate.  

In September 2016 the school opened a new ASD unit with three students starting and provision for another three in the future.

 

 

 

Breadth Balance and Relevance of Curriculum to students’ needs.

 

 

As a rural boys school with a strong academic tradition, significant consideration is given to curriculum provision.  The breadth of subjects is regularly monitored and addressed as required.  Subjects such as Applied Maths, Music, Art, Technical Drawing, Agricultural Science and Economics are provided after hours to help maximise each students potential in their given area of aptitudinal strength.

Balance is essential and care is given to ensure that subjects are available at appropriate levels to meet all students needs e.g. Applied Maths – Foundation level Maths.  Subject choice at senior level recognises the different aptitudes students possess, and mindful of this the balance between Maths/Science subjects and Business/Humanities are separated to maximise suitable subject choice.

Practical subjects such as Design and Communication Graphics (as an additional subject) and Technology are made available to senior students.

Language and matriculation requirements are clearly outlined to meet the needs of the high proportion who progress to 3rd level education.

 

 

 

 

 

Provision of extracurricular activities.

 

The College engages in a wide range of extra and co-curricular activities.

Sports:  Gaelic football and hurling, athletics, golf and table-tennis.

Quizzes.

Drama and Debating.

Exchange programmes in France and Italy.

Charity fund raising activities.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Provision of Information Support and Advice.

 

 

The pastoral care system is led by Guidance Counsellor Ms. Mary O’Connor assisted by class teachers who have responsibility for the general welfare of students.  A full guidance service is provided so that each student is fully prepared for entry to the third level system or for the world of work. Formal classes are timetabled for all 4th, 5th and 6th year students while informal provision is provided to Junior Cert students as deemed appropriate.

Individual students seeking advice on personal or academic issues can meet through an informal system with appropriate school personnel i.e. guidance counsellor/chaplain etc.

 

Parental Involvement.

Parents are active through the Parents Association and are encouraged to contact the school whenever the need arises.  Through the association they are involved in disseminating information, organising information evenings, fundraising, social activities and policy development.

At all stages of their sons progress, parental involvement is encouraged and acted upon which is evident by the large attendance at 1st year induction evening, 3rd year subject choice information evening and 6th year CAO procedures and careers information evenings.

 

 

 

Curriculum Planning and Co-ordination.

 

Subject Departments.

English
History
Maths
Business
French
Accounting
Geography
Chemistry
Science
Physics
Irish
Biology
LCVP
Art
CSPE
Music
SPHE
Economics
Design and Communication Graphics
 
Technology
 

 

Included in the content

(a) Long term – short term planning

(b) Cross curricular issues.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Curricular Implementation

Teaching and Learning Processes.

 

Grouping of Pupils.

 

All Classes are of mixed ability in first year.  In second year, based on performance indicators, students may be separated into higher and ordinary level classes in a limited number of subjects.

At senior cycle all students study Irish, English and Maths at either higher or ordinary level in separate classes.  In most other subject areas both levels would be incorporated into the single classroom setting.

 

Teaching methodologies.

All children learn differently therefore a variety of different teaching methodologies are used in our school. Some of these include Discovery Learning, Assessment for Learning, Co-operative Learning and Team Teaching as well as the more traditional teaching approaches. Pupils also carry out Fieldwork, Project work and partake in group and individual research. 

 

Classroom Management/Atmosphere.

 

 

The College promotes a Positive Behavioural discipline system whereby opportunities to acknowledge individual and class accomplishments are promoted.  Mutual respect and co-operation is at the core of our Mission Statement.

Positive relationships within the classroom greatly enhances the learning environment for all involved. Students are encouraged to learn from their mistakes while discipline procedures are applied in a manner to encourage a change in behaviour rather than to punish the individual.

Development of students as effective responsible learners.

 

Through a process of mutual respect and co-operation students are encouraged from entry to take individual responsibility for learning.  First year subject teachers set standards by undertaking the homework with the students for the first two weeks in the school.

Revision programmes are outlined in advance of exams while a review of term tests take place with all staff and is co-ordinated by the Guidance Counsellor.

At junior cycle study methodology is undertaken by the Guidance Counsellor, while at Senior Cycle an external expert in study technique is contracted.  Students are made aware of their learning styles in Junior Cycle and are advised to focus on these strengths while undertaking academic tasks.

On occasion when deemed necessary parental involvement is sought to aid the student to become responsible learners in an atmosphere of co-operation.

Student engagement in subject and overall achievement.

 

The formation of well balances and rounded individuals, who are able to take their place as valuable members of society, is the chief goal of the College.  Notwithstanding this, examination results are certainly important, and the College achieves well above the national average in the allocation of Leaving Cert. points.

While high points are clearly welcome, the most important goal is that the student achieves his potential.  On average about 90% of our students obtain places in 3rd level education, or gain employment within one month of receiving their exam results.

 

Curricular outcomes.

Pupils’ progress and levels of attainment.

 

(i)      Assessment Procedures.

 

The College endeavours to keep parents full informed on their sons ongoing application and progress.  All incoming first years undertake assessment tests to ascertain levels of academic attainment and help identify students who may benefit from resource time. 

Minor tests and assessments are regularly given and communicated to parents during the school year.  There are major exams at Christmas and Summer while state exam students undertake pre-exams and follow up tests where deemed necessary by the teacher. All State Pre Exams are corrected by subject teachers. This helps ensure prompt return of scripts and clear and accurate feedback to all students. From 2016 onwards assessment of transition year students will incorporate a wider range of assessments as well as the traditional end of year house exams. These will include continuous assessment, project work , group work and oral presentations etc.

(ii)     Comparison of attainment levels with levels of entry/national standards

De La Salle Leaving Cert results 2017

Average Points 377.

Points Totals
DLS
NA
>350
65.2%
49.2%
>400
43.5%
36.4%
>450
32.6%
24.1%
>500
15.2%
12.3%

Sunday Times survey 2017:

  • 720 Post Primary Schools
  • DLS in to top 25%
  • Top 10 boys school in Cork
  • 90% of students attending third level CAO listed courses

 

 

De La Salle Leaving Cert results 2018

Points Totals
DLS
NA
>400
64%
40%
>500
30%
13%

 

The number of students who received a H1, H2 and H3 in the following
subjects in De La Salle College vs the National Average.

Maths 64 % DLS and 38 % national average
Business 65 % DLS and 39 % national average
English 73 % DLS and 33 % national average
Physics 83 % DLS and 44 % national average
Geography 66% DLS and 36% national average

(iii)    Evaluation of learning in relation to both Holistic Development and Academic Achievement.

 

The formation of well balanced and rounded individuals who are able to take their place as valuable members of society is the chief goal of the College.

As stated in our Mission Statement:

“Our community aims to assist our pupils to develop their full potential in a Christian environment”.

With this in mind, the key components are at the core of this philosophy, as a result the emotional, spiritual, physical as well as the intellectual needs are developed.  Established Counselling procedures are in place.  A Chaplin attends weekly and Catholic religious occasions are acknowledged by appropriate service, and an extensive Physical Education provision is available in a range of areas for all students.

               

 

Curriculum Policies.

 

Homework.

1st Year Induction.

RE, SPHE, RSE and Guidance Plan.

Subject Departments.

Section 4-Organisational Policies:

School Policies

Policies in Green are mandatory which need annual ratification
Policies in red are mandatory
Policies in black are optional
Policies in Blue are related to Child Protection
 

Policy
Ratified by BOM

Admissions
5/6/18

Attendance
5/6/18

Child Protection Templates
5/6/18

C.O.B including antibullying
5/6/18

Critical Incident Management
14/11/17

Data Protection


Dignity in the work place
04/04/17

Homework
04/04/17

Acceptable Internet Usage
5/6/18

RE
22/06/17

RSE
14/11/17

Health and Safety Statement
01/02/18

Health and Safety Policy
01/02/18

Substance Use
15 th Feb 2017

Special Education Needs
5/6/18

Staff Induction


First Year Induction
26th April 2016

Student Support


Suspension and Expulsion


Concussion
5/6/18

SPHE


Positive Discipline
15 Feb 2017

Student Council


Ethos Handbook


KAL House Admission
5/6/18

Guidance Plan
5/6/18

Yard/Playground Supervision


Procedures for school outings


Code of conduct for all school personnel


Intimate care policy


Administration of medication and first aid


Use of external persons to supplement delivery of curriculum


Procedures for use of external sports coaches


Procedures for one to one teaching


Procedures for one to one counselling


Work Experience & work shadowing


 

 

 

 

Section 5-Procedures and Practices:

School calendar:

School Year 2018/2019.

September 2018.

Sept. 14th             Whole school staff inservice – Junior Cycle Wellbeing programme.  Closed for students.

Sept. 20th             Open Night for incoming 1st years 2019/2020  5.00 – 8.00p.m.

Sept. 25th             Information meeting for 1st year parents. 7.30p.m.

October 2018.

Oct. 16th               6th Year Parent/Teacher meeting 4.15 – 6.45p.m.

Oct. 25th               3rd year Parent/Teacher meeting 4.15 – 6.45p.m.

Oct. 29th  – Nov. 2nd    incl.                             Mid-term break

November 2018.

Nov. 12th              5th  Year Parent/Teacher meeting 4.15 – 6.45p.m.

 

December 2017.

Dec. 3rd  – Dec. 7th incl.   Transition Year Work Experience

Dec. 4th                                 CAO Application – Parents  information evening 7.30p.m.

Dec. 18th – Dec. 21st incl.               Christmas House Exams. Junior cycle students finish exams Thur. 20th.

Dec. 21st                                               Christmas Holidays.

January 2019.

Jan. 7th                  School re-opens

Jan. 28th               1st Year Parent/Teacher meeting 4.15 – 6.45p.m.

 

February 2019.

Feb 5th                                  2nd Year Parent/Teacher meeting 4.15 – 6.45p.m.

Feb. 14th                              4th Year Parent/Teacher meeting 4.15 – 6.45p.m.

Feb. 18th to Feb. 22nd   incl.           Mid-term break

Feb. 26th    – March 8th                   Leaving and Junior Cert. Pre-exams

 

March 2019.

Feb. 27th – March 1st       5th year LCVP Work Shadowing

March 18th                          School Closed Bank holiday for St. Patricks Day.

April 2019.

April 11th              3rd Year senior cycle parents subject choice information meeting 7.30p.m.

April 12th                              School closing for Easter holidays.

Apr. 29th                               School re-opens after Easter holidays.

May 2019.

1st Year Italian Cultural Exchange – Dates to be decided

May 15th              De La Salle Founders Day – Normal school day with Mass at 12.00

May 23rd              Leaving Cert. Graduation Night

May 22nd  – May 24th       Transition year summer exams.

May 27th –  May 31st     incl.     Transition Year work experience

May 27th  – May 31st    incl.       Summer House Exams. Junior Cycle students finish exams Thur. May 30th.

Dates for French Exchange to be decided.

Please Note:   Classes will finish at 3.30p.m. on the days of Parent/Teacher meetings.

No study on days of Parent/Teacher meetings.

 

 

Visitors, sales reps, others:

All visitors to the school are instructed to present themselves at reception on arrival. It is possible for visitors to enter the school by one of three doors, however normally the main door next to the secretary and Principals office is the one which they avail of. Here they are greeted by our secretary and wait until she has called the relevant party for them. In the case of a food delivery for our canteen the door on the other side of the building is used where they are greeted by our canteen staff.

 

Arrival and dismissal of pupils:

The school opens at 8.00am after which time all pupils are free to enter the school and wait in the hall or social and pastoral area for classes to begin at 9.00am. Junior Cycle students are required to stay in school for the remainder of the day and leave with Senior Cycle students when school finishes at 3.50pm. However if a Junior Cycle student lives within walking distance of the school he is permitted to go home for his lunch break(with parental consent) which runs from 1.15pm to 1.50pm. All Senior Cycle students are permitted to leave the school during lunch break. Where a student wishes to leave the school during the day he must have a note in his journal explaining the reason for his departure and subsequently  get his journal signed by either the Deputy Principal or Principal. Following this he may leave the school provided he has signed out in the office.  

 

Supervision duties:

Supervision duties in our school involve monitoring the internal building during morning break, all classrooms are locked and empty during this time and the students are located in either the hall or social and pastoral area. Duties expand to encompass the basketball court, football pitch and school perimeter during lunch break, when the vast majority of senior cycle students will go down to the town for their lunch and the majority of junior cycle students will remain on campus. During break times there would normally be 4/6 members of staff on supervision duty.

Exceptional closures:

In the recent past the school has had to close for extreme weather conditions such as flooding, ice or snow. In such cases students have been left home early once safe means of transport have been arranged. Parents are notified as early as possible through our txt messaging service if an exceptional closure is to take place. This is usually undertaken in conjunction with the other post primary schools to help facilitate the coordination of transport etc.

Where exceptional closures take place, procedures as outlined by the Department of Education are in place to make up for the lost class contact at a pre agreed time.

Photocopying and copyright issues:

Students pay a voluntary subscription of 50euros (80 euros per family) each year which helps defray the costs associated with photocopying etc, each year. This fee entitles them to as much photocopying as they need during the year depending on the subject teachers discretion. It also covers all House and Pre Exam costs.

Subsequently the school pays The Irish Copyright Licencing Agency (180 euro) and the Motion Picture Licencing Company (101.35 euro) for the rights to photocopy and broadcast all materials which will be relevant to the students learning.

Text book selection:

All text books are selected on a departmental basis. Changing of text books is kept to a minimum so as to keep costs low and where possible the school will buy back old text books from the students provided they are of an acceptable quality. In some subjects such as Religion, C.S.P.E., S.P.H.E. and Technology, the school provides class sets of books to the students which reduces the financial burden on parents.

Once subject text books have been agreed upon. No change of text book will take place unless there is a significant revision of the existing text or the introduction of a new syllabus.

 

Use of mobile phones:

All mobile phones must be switched off during class  hours. Any phone being used without permission will be confiscated and handed in to the Deputy Principals office. Phones are allowed to be turned on at break and lunch times.

 

 

 

Class and classroom allocation:

The college moved to subject based classrooms in 2007. This allowed subject specialisation take place which has led to a print rich environment and appropriate I.T. provision in each class room. Classrooms are allocated on a subject basis where most subjects have a main classroom that is occupied as much as possible by the main teachers in that subject area. Students will then move from classroom to classroom in between classes. Subject classrooms are allocated on an annual basis based on the needs of the school.

Keeping of class records and roll books:

Individual teachers keep records of all class details in the teacher diary.

Further records are kept by management  in relation to Christmas and Summer exam results and   attendance. Attendance records are maintained on an annual basis by post holder responsibility for student attendance. 

 

Lunches:

The school canteen provides a variety of hot and cold food for the pupils every day. We also have a “tuck” shop which sells, nutritional bars, fruit, water etc.

Transfer of essential information:

A variety of different forms of communication are used with regard to the transfer of essential information within the school.

Communication with individual subject teachers would be informal and face to face. When information needs to be imparted to the whole teaching staff, a staff meeting would be convened. Staff email is also used to keep staff up to date with school related information.

Communications with parents can be a phone call for individual cases or a group text message may be used for a whole class or the whole student body. In some cases it would be necessary to arrange for the parents of a student to come to the school for a meeting with the Principal,  Deputy Principal or relevant teacher.

Additional letters may be sent home from time to time as required.

Generally the Principal would also inform the relevant parties of all current school issues at any Parents Association and Board of Management meetings.

 

 

Teacher absences:

 In the event of a teacher being on certified sick leave a substitute teacher is put in place. For uncertified leave an internal school rota is used to cover the teacher’s classes. Whenever possible absent teachers email relevant work for their classes to complete in their absence.

Teachers may also be absent on school business such as matches, trips etc. In such cases the supervision rota will also be used , however if a teacher is out with a single class group, the teachers in the school which are responsible for that group at different times during the day will cover for the absent teacher.

Reception of substitute or student teachers:

All substitute teachers are met by the Principal or Deputy Principal in the morning before they start. Here they are taken through all relevant information including timetables, class lists and work to be done which will be included in the substitute teacher folder .Then they are taken to the staffroom and introduced to the other teachers. After this the other teachers in the relevant subject area can go through any other codes of practice or lesson plans with the substitute teacher.

Student teachers will each have a subject teacher who is responsible for guidance and evaluation during the year. The subject teacher can allow the student teacher observe his/her classes during the year. This normally takes place during the start of the and as the year progresses the roles reverse and the subject teacher can observe some of the student teachers classes with the aim of giving some support and advice. The subject teacher and the student teacher are in contact on a daily basis with the subject teacher available to answer any questions and give support where necessary.

We also have a mentoring system in place. Here the mentor begins the school year by meeting the student teacher/NQT and informing him/her on all aspects of the school life in De La Salle. He/she is given a tour of the school and given the names of the key personnel (class teachers, subject teachers etc.). The ST/NQT is provided with all books and resources needed and given keys to the various classrooms being used.

 The ST/NQT is given an information booklet which includes the following information:

Timetable/Class lists/ Teacher lists/ICT/Printing /photocopying/Assessment procedures/ Information regarding students who may have special educational needs in his classes/ Code of behaviour/Roll Call/Late arrivals/Departures/School policies/ school procedures/child protection guidelines/ and any other day to day information needed.

It is essential that the student teacher or the newly qualified teacher attends the staff meetings at the beginning of the school year as all relevant information and procedures are discussed and revisited before the beginning of the new school year.  Also, there are subject department meetings where the plans for all classes are prepared by all the subject teachers.

Once classes begin, the mentor keeps in daily contact with the ST/NQT and the cooperating teacher and is the point of contact for both if any issues arise. Also, the mentor arranges various observation classes in different subject areas.

Staff meetings:

The exact number of staff meetings may change from a year to year basis depending on Croke Park hours etc.

School tours:

In 1993, the school began an annual exchange programme with a sister De La Salle school in Bordeaux, France. Participating 2nd and 4th year students spend two weeks in France with a host family, improving their grasp of the language and broadening their understanding of the culture. A return visit is paid by the French students to Macroom, where they are hosted by the families of the students who made the trip over. As the longest ongoing exchange programme in the country, it has proved to be a very successful and worthwhile endeavour, and it is envisaged that it will continue to flourish for many years.

In 2006, the college linked up with the successful cultural exchange between Macroom and the town of Marcallo con Cassone, near Milan in northern Italy. In April a large number of our first years travel to Italy for a week, returning an earlier visit to Macroom by the Italian students. This trip has become one of the most eagerly anticipated highlights of the year.

As well as this first years are also taken away for a bonding day at the start of the year which helps to let the group get to know each other a little better. This is planned by the class teachers and consists of taking the group away on a bus to do a fun activity for the day.

 

 

Participation in competitions:

The school has a long tradition in Gaelic football and hurling, with teams entering competitions from under 14 up to senior level in county and provincial competitions.

Over the years we have also competed with regularity in competitions for other sports including athletics, basketball, table-tennis, orienteering and golf.

In recent years we have had a vibrant drama society and compete in drama competitions both locally and at a national level.

We also compete with great success in competitions/quizzes in relation to all the different subject areas, the highlight of which being when one of our students won the Young Scientist of the Year Award some years ago.

 

Contact with other schools:

There are three schools in Macroom. St. Marys girls secondary  school, McEgan College Vocational school and De La Salle. We have an excellent relationship with the other schools in Macroom and in particular St.Marys where we have developed a very strong relationship   over the years. We currently share the resource of and accounting, art and music teacher and at the end of each year the leaving cert students of both schools hold a joint Debs/Grads ball. Also the French departments in both schools have collaborated since 1993 in bringing boys and girls from both schools on the French exchange to Bordeaux.

We have also some strong connections with other schools in the De La Salle order. We regularly play football matches against St. Fachtna’s De La Salle Skibbereen and on a bi-annual basis we take the senior football team to De La Salle Castlebar for a weekend of football and team bonding. 

Transition from primary school:

As the transition from primary to secondary school can be difficult for many students we have put procedures in place to help the students as much as possible. Sometime in the end of April we hold a ‘’Activities morning’’ in the school for all the incoming first years. Here they will have a chance to get to know each other before they start in the following September. We organise games of soccer, basketball, rounders etc as well as letting them partake in a quiz and watch a DVD about the school.   

Also in January the Principal and Guidance Councillor meet each prospective pupil with his parents to help get to know one another in advance of commencing his education in De La Salle and this gives an opportunity to address any potential concerns in advance.

 Furthermore when the first years arrive in September we have a first year induction programme in place which we have found to be of great benefit . First year class teachers generally take the first years through this programme on their first day explaining all the information regarding lockers, timetables, books etc. At this time we also have a buddy system where we break the first years up into groups of three or four and assign each group to a transition year student (mentor). This student shows his group around the school and answers any questions which the first years would have, after this they then check in with their group on a weekly basis , thus ensuring their smooth transition to secondary school.

The programme has been tailored to meet the needs of the first years and includes strategies such as letting them out of class five minutes early before morning break and lunch time so that they will be first in the queue for the canteen. They are allowed to do their homework in class for the first two weeks, this allows the teacher to show them exactly what is required for homework and does not over burden the students with homework during what is a very hectic time for them. There is a first year mass during the first few weeks and the whole class is also taken away for a bonding day early in the first term.

Towards the end of September we then have an information night for the parents of first year students. This gives us an opportunity to address any concerns which the parents might have as well as informing them on areas such as homework, study, acceptable behaviour etc.

Section 6-Development Section:

Sub-section 1

  • De La Salle College Macroom 6 Year Plan.
  •  

Years 1 and 2

 

1. Work Environment

(a) Staff Room – reorganised, added dining table, coffee table, burker, lockers and storage.

(b) Science Lab – Replaced all taps and projector screen.

(c) Classrooms – Provided school owned Laptops in all classrooms.

(d) Perimeter Trees – Cut to allow natural light into the staff room and 5 classrooms.

(e) PA System – upgraded.

(f) Fire Alarm – upgraded.

(g) CCTV – upgraded.

(h) Main Hall – tables and additional benches added.

(i) Student Facilities – 3rd table tennis table acquired, board games and room provided for lunch time (wet weather).

2. School Self Evaluation

  • Oct 2014 – Met with Cornelius Lane (PDST)
  • Dec 2014 – Met with Fionn O Murchu (Dept Ed)
  • Focus on priority areas
  • School very good academic standards , select small area e.g. ‘’questioning’’.
  • Follow up staff meetings to identify Literacy and Numeracy goals.

 

 

Priorities :

1. Literacy - We propose to roll out a paired reading programme with the target second year group, with the help of the current transition year group. 

N.B. This was reviewed following the review of the first year 2015 group. The literacy team decided to prioritise the 2015 first years in the paired reading programme based on need and age group.  Originally as part of SSE, we carried out the data analysis in 2013/2014 and didn’t consider in the incoming first year group of 2015/2016. From a general perspective they appear to be a good group with approx 73% are on par/above their suggested reading age. However on closer examination there is a significant need. See data above from 2015/2016 first years.

We envisage an overall improvement in reading age from both groups. We are planning on carrying out the intervention in 2016 and we will liaise with the transition year coordinator in the planning process.

Spelling ability of all classes. This will be assessed at the end of the programme by all subject teachers in their classes, by means of a spelling test. This will determine if there has been an improvement in spelling.

Ensure mistakes are being picked up in students' work across all subjects: One strategy we've used to improve student literacy is asking all departments to mark writing for accuracy. Teachers were reminded and asked to highlight mistakes in work they marked, irrespective of the subject e.g. spelling and punctuation.  The idea behind the approach is to flag how important accuracy is and make the point that clarity in writing will improve students' grades across all subjects. All teachers will help to raise awareness of the importance of literacy through marking for accuracy, making literacy every teacher’s responsibility.

  • 2. Numeracy - Improve the average grade for subjects with a mathematical component from 58% to 63%.
  • Creating a numeracy rich environment
  • Ensuring that first year students understand the language used in textbook, in particular terms.
  • Ensuring that students have a good knowledge of basic operations such as estimating and finding a percentage and do not rely on calculators.
  • To help first year students recognise and become more proficient with mathematical applications in all subjects which have a mathematical component.
  • To help students see the relevance of maths to their everyday lives outside the classroom. This can be done by highlighting examples of where you use maths in the real world on a daily basis. This in turn should help to improve the overall levels of Numeracy within the school.

3. Homework/Assessment - We propose to develop our specific targeting of students in difficulty through the use of the SNA system.

We envisage a renewed emphasis on learned homework as opposed to written. Teachers surveyed felt that 87% of students were not using the Homework Journal appropriately to record non-written work. We aim to reduce that to 30%.Students to record all of their homework in the journal (written and learning)

Reduce the instances of academic loggings for non-compliance with homework policy

We will have all first year students operating a plastic folder system where all of the materials for each subject are stored. Class teachers to check journals regularly

Contact with parent/guardian of students identified as vulnerable on an ongoing basis.

Survey of teachers to test levels of compliance with homework policy

Subject Teacher/ Class Teacher/ SNA to meet to discuss ongoing progress and strategies. Increase compliance to full use of Homework Journal to 90%

Log book entries for Homework infractions to be reduced by 50%

Teachers satisfaction with homework compliance to increase by 25% (Determined by survey)

100% of first Year students to operate the folder system

3. ASD Unit 

  • Applied for planning permission in Oct 2014 and oversaw the build process. This was completed in Sept 2015.

4. IT Equipment upgrade

  • School Fundraising draw – Mid-term break Oct 2014 – €10.5K
  • Applied for DCG Grant aid  - received €35K  in Oct 2015.
  • Upgraded DCG room furniture and fittings – Nov 2015
  • Provided each classroom with school laptop
  • Review of Supervision and Substitution 
  • Allocation of yard duties (Sept 2014)
  • School Web Site 
  • Upgrade required
  • Collection of email addresses of past pupils and parents commenced.
  •  Apply for new Major Capital Works Programme 
  • Application was put in on June 2015
  • Training and CPD of ASD unit Staff 
  • Commenced in 2014 and ongoing
  • Recommencement of School Policy development 
  • Commenced in 2014 and ongoing
  • First year induction 
  • We have developed the contact with incoming 1st years bringing them in for an ‘’activities morning’’ before they officially start so they can get to know some of their future classmates and get used to the school also.

 

 

 

 

Years 3 and 4  (Sept 2016-Sept 2018)

  • Review of posts of responsibility and Croke Park hours application.
  • AP1 and AP2 posts of responsibility were assigned after the interview process. These positions can be seen in our staff list.
  • Croke Park hours 2018/2019 are as follow:
  • > 10 hours for planning and development
  • > 3 hours for the open night
  • > 9 hours for parent teacher meetings
  • > 3 hours for half in, half out staff meetings
  • > 8 hours for staff meetings
  • Junior Cert subject review and establishment of a Board of Studies.
  •  
  • Teachers are actively involved in the implementation of the new junior cert curriculums in their subject area.
  • Mr. Fergus Ryan is in charge of curriculum development as part of his post and will be pursuing this from 2018 onwards.
  • Review of Leaving Cert practical subject provision (DCG).
  • DCG is offered by De La Salle as a leaving certificate subject outside of class time. This subject is being reviewed as a potential option subject for leaving certificate.
  • Introduce RSE programme at senior cycle and coding and second language modules into TYO programme.
  • A senior cycle RSE course has been introduced.
  • Computer classes in Transition year have been introduced as part the TY curriculum.
  • Ongoing review of school policies and development of additional policies e.g. Admissions Policy for ASD Unit.
  • A new admissions policy has been created that includes an admissions policy for the ASD unit.
  • The following policies have been ratified
  • Teaching and Learning
  • Evaluation of SSE Programme.
  • SSE has entered phase 2 topic 1, with the focus on the use of learning intentions and success criteria. In 2018/19 we will begin our investigation year for phase 2 topic 2.
  •  

Introduce a more varied approach to assessing our transition year students.

  • In transition year, a percentage of their final reports at Christmas and Summer is allocated to continuous assessment.

Introduce a paired maths programme.

  • A paired maths programme was introduced in 2016 and continues to run successfully on a yearly basis. Transition year students tutor first students who are identified as needing extra help in mathematics. This has benefited all students involved, both mathematically and socially. Full details of the paired maths programme can be found in the SSE report for numeracy.
  •  
  • Identification of priority areas in the teaching and learning process.
  • SSE has identified learning intentions and success criteria as areas that can help develop and improve teaching and learning in De La Salle.
  • Subject Departments
  • All subject department have developed their departments. Departments are more formalised and structured with a designated subject coordinator. This has resulted in more effective collaboration and sharing of best practices.
  • Review of results
  • Subject uptake at senior cycle
  • Assessment of Learning
  • Assessment for learning
  • ‘’Questioning’’
  • No comment Peer Observation
  • Some teachers have taken part in peer observation on a voluntary basis but there is still room for a greater uptake in this strategy.
  • Reestablishment of the PPU
  • Email addresses of all past pupils have been gathered on the day of their leaving cert results, with their consent with the aim of keeping them up to date with De La Salle developments. This initiative began in 2014 and will continue to run. The gathering of this information is in line with the new GDPR protocols.
  • The establishment of the De La Salle Macroom facebook page and new website has also allowed past pupils to view activities that are taking place within the school.

           8.WSE/MML recommendations 

  • Recommendations of the previous WES have been addressed.
  • Admin IT upgrade
  • VSware was introduced in 2016 for information such as attendance and exam results.
  • All teachers have access to as central server (OneDrive) where information can be stored and shared. This has led to enhanced collaboration and sharing of resources among the staff.
  • All pupils and staff members have a school email address through Microsoft outlook.
  • The computer lab has been upgraded with all new desk top computers and the room has been rearranged to make teaching and learning more effective.
  • All classrooms now have a desktop computer and a data projector.

Years 5 and 6 ( Sept 2018 – 2020)

1. New school building progression.

2. ASD unit expansion.

3. Maintenance of Plant and equipment – roof etc.

4. Full implementation of new JC Curriculum review.

5. Classroom ICT integration and expansion.

6. Policy development.

7. Teaching and Learning progression.

 

 

Sub-section 2.

School Self-Evaluation Reports

    Evaluation period: Sept 2014-Dec 2014

 

  (A) School Self-Evaluation Report for Literacy

1. Introduction

1.1 The focus of the evaluation

A school self-evaluation of teaching and learning in De La Salle College was undertaken during the period September 2014 to Dec 2014. During the evaluation, teaching and learning of literacy across all subjects was evaluated with focus as follows:

  • Literacy attainment of Junior Cert students.

This is a report on the findings of the evaluation.

1.2 School context

De La Salle College Macroom is a catholic voluntary secondary school dedicated to maintaining the spiritual and educational values of Jean Baptiste de la Salle, the Patron Saint of teachers and founder of the De la Salle order. Even though the brothers no longer have an active role in the school, we remain committed to achievement in the academic, sporting and development spheres of life as begun by them in Macroom in 1933. The order relinquished control in 1991, however the school remains part of the De la Salle family of schools.

Currently the school caters for 320 students which include a number of students with special needs as well as students whose native language is not English.

The location of the school, in a quiet area away from the noise and bustle of the streets, leads to an atmosphere of peace and tranquillity that is conducive to effective learning. We had a WSE in September 2007.

The staff have broken up into three working groups.i.e. Literacy, Numeracy and Homework. We have tried to keep a broad subject representation within each group. Each group was responsible for evaluating the strengths and weaknesses within their area, estimating a base line from which all progress will be measured, bringing areas in need of improvement and future targets to the whole staff in order to get them signed off on and driving the improvement process in their area.

2. The findings

  • Having reviewed the state examination results we can conclude that in 2013 we are above average in the number of students that sat Higher Level English in their Junior Cert (National average for Higher Level take up was 72.4% and in DLS we had 87.5%).

In 2013 we are on average with the number of students nationally who sit HL for Leaving Cert. Our Leaving Cert students achieved above the national average honours grades.

In an attempt to focus on literacy we decided to review the data relating to the reading age of first years in 2013 and 2014. We felt this might be more specific and help us to identify a definite and precise area that we could focus on.[ Note: We have since reviewed the target group in light of the data presented by the SEN team on 2015 first year group.]

We also asked the staff for subjective feedback on the current first and second year cohort from their observation.

We spoke with the SEN team.

Having reviewed the data provided by the GRT2 test results we concluded that approx 66% of students from the 2014 group are en par/above their chronological reading age.

17% of students are approximately a year behind their chronological age.

17% of students are between 2 and 4 years behind their chronological age.

17% of students were identified as target students who need intervention to improve their literacy.

Having reviewed the data we concluded that in general 58% of students from the 2013 group are en par/above their chronological reading age.

14% of students out are approximately a year behind their chronological reading age.

26% of students are between two and four years behind their chronological reading age.

In total we identified 15 students as target students who need intervention to improve their literacy.

We concluded that because of the fact that more students need intervention in second year than first year and the fact that they are due to sit State exams in June 2016 that we would prioritise the second year group.

However in September 2015, the SEN team approached the literacy group raising concerns about the 2015 first year class. As a group there are a large number of students who present with special educational and social needs and it was felt that they would benefit greatly from such a focussed intervention. This presented the literacy team with a challenge. Having thought about it, the group concluded that if we were to go ahead with the intervention as originally planned, it would mean transition year students working with current third year students. This would present its own challenge as there is not a significant age gap and may present more difficulties. Also, it is not best practice and would potentially negate what the aim of the intervention is in the first place.  It was felt that the 2015 second year students did not present with the same degree of need as the first years, so we concluded that the paired reading programme would be rolled out to the 2015 first year group.

When planning for the school year 2016/2017, having reviewed the success of the literacy intervention from the 2015/2016 school year, it was decided to continue implementing the literacy programme for incoming first year students. This was decided as the original second year group which raised concerns would now be beginning Junior Cycle studies and a break from classroom contact time could be detrimental to their success at junior cycle. Also, as highlighted in the findings of the report, many paired reading programmes are conducted in primary schools and so for many students who may have been targeted at primary level, this would not be such a new experience. Finally, the school was able to facilitate the timetabling of First Year students with Transition Year students for class period seven on a Tuesday. First year students were timetabled for non-exam subjects and Transition Years were timetabled for English. As the English teacher was also the literacy co-ordinator, this led to minimal disruption for students and the school community as a whole.

Data from 2016/2017 first years

In the 2016/2017 year group approx. 57% of students are performing on par with or above average. This is quite concerning as in the school year 2015/2017 approx 73% of students were performing on par/above average. This is a drop of 16%.

Furthermore, 13% of students had reading ages that ranged between two and four years behind  their peers approximately

In a few cases students are presenting on the autism spectrum and have significant social needs and so it was felt that the programme would benefit these students from a social perspective.

This cohort has a mean reading age of +7 months.

At least 8  students have been identified as needing significant help.

In the whole year two students are 1 year behind their reading age – 3%

Almost 20% are between 1 and 12 months behind their reading age.

Also in whole group approx 13% are 2 to 4 years behind suggested reading age.

The literacy team felt that these students would benefit the most from the intervention particularly as a result of the relatively low average reading age. “Reading with someone encourages students to try reading materials that may be just above their normal reading level. Paired Reading can also be used to build oral skills so that reluctant readers can work toward reading in front of a large group.” (www.jct.ie)

From teacher observations spelling, grammar and punctuation were identified as an issue for all year groups irrespective of whether or not they were higher or ordinary level. The Literacy group felt that it was imperative that this issue be addressed across the board from first to sixth year.  This can be done by teachers picking up mistakes during the marking process.

First years 2016

  • Mean reading age is +7 months.
  • Standard deviation is 23 months.
  • Average deviation is 19 months.
  • The range (highest reading age – lowest reading age) is 91 months

 

3. Progress made on previously-identified targets improvement targets

De La Salle College Macroom

Report on Literacy Intervention 

 

Introduction

 

A paired reading programme was run the in the college by the literacy team in April/ May 2016. It ran on Tuesdays and Thursdays for six weeks in room 10. The literacy intervention is part of our school improvement plan for literacy as part of School Self Evaluation.

 

Following this first initiative on the paired reading programme, it was decided that a paired reading programme would be run on Tuesday afternoons for 6 weeks in room 7. There would only be one paired reading class timetabled for 6 weeks, to facilitate the introduction of a paired maths programme, also run on Tuesday afternoons, based on the recommendations of the previous programme.

 

Rationale for the literacy intervention:

 

Having read and reviewed “Effective Interventions for Struggling Readers” published by National Educational and Psychological Service(http://www.education.ie/en/Education-Staff/Information/NEPS-Literacy-Resource/neps_literacy_good_practice_guide.pdf),  the literacy team   choose the  relatively low-cost intervention of the paired reading programme, as there is evidence that peers can be effective in raising reading standards, both through co-operative learning and through peer tuition.

 

Description of the Programme

 

We looked at the document to define paired reading. Peer or paired reading is a well known approach.  Broadly speaking, those who need help with reading are matched with a non-professional who assists by reading to the learner, reading alongside the learner and then listening to the learner read in a graduated system of support. There are various models or peer tutoring, including cross-age peer tutoring and class-based peer tutoring. Procedures for correcting errors and giving frequent praise are specified.

  

 The paired reading programme is cost-effective in terms of teacher time, but needs on-going organisation, including the training of tutors, monitoring of progress, maintenance of the programme (for example monitoring attendance and trouble-shooting incompatible pairings). Logistical issues of time, space and suitable reading materials also need consideration.

 

According to the NEPS document short, intensive bursts of intervention, with daily, targeted support, appear to be more effective than longer term interventions. Therefore we decided to run the programme twice a week over a six week period. The evidence is that effective support for struggling readers usually involves one to one or small group tuition. A highly structured, systematic approach has been found to be the most effective. Student reading fluency is enhanced by reading and rereading familiar texts and reading aloud.

 

The Literacy team worked closely with the staff, in particular the numeracy team and put together a six week paired reading programme where fourth year students were trained as reading tutors and were paired with first year target students (tutees). The literacy team along with the tutors ran the programme once a week for six weeks in room 10 and the success of the project was celebrated in a ceremony where award certificates were distributed to the participants. Special mention was made to one particular tutee to commend his hard work, commitment and dedication. We held a ceremony and invited school management, class teachers, transition year coordinator and the literacy team. We had an “afternoon tea party” and the students were served by the teachers.

 

At the end of the block of intervention, the programme was evaluated, through teacher reflection, curriculum-based assessment, student feedback and importantly, records of student’s progress (using pre and post intervention measures).

 

Facts and Findings 

 

Our key finding was that other members of the school community(apart from the SEN team), such as volunteers can deliver highly effective reading programmes, IF they are well trained and supported, and are following an evidence- based intervention.

 

In 2015/2016 school year the average participant made nine months progress in word reading and in reading comprehension over the period of the intervention (6 weeks of tuition).

 

In the year 2016/2017 the average progression was 3 months reading age over the 6 week tuition. However, outside factors must be considered when assessing these results. Where students had 2 paired reading sessions per week in the 2015/2016 programme, in the 2016/2017 programme only 1 session per week was assigned to the paired reading programme. Perhaps the decrease in tutor-tutee contact time may account for the drop in average progression.

 

As part of our measurable outcomes our aim was to achieve an increase in reading age of the target group by 5% over a three year period. We achieved an increase of on average 11.5%. 

 

Conclusions

  
  • The research into improvements in reading ages has shown improvements of an average of nine months per student. Each student improved on average 11.5%. Our original target was an improvement of 5% so we have surpassed our target by 6.5%.
  • Not all students demonstrated progression, in 3 cases students demonstrated a regression. In 2 of the 3 cases the students were submitted to the programme, not over concerns for their reading ability, rather for behavioural and social reasons. In both cases feedback from students reflected an enjoyable experience in the paired reading programme with one student noting he felt significantly more confident and the other revealing he now found it easier to concentrate in class. In the other case, the student in question was absent, due to illness, for a large period of time during the end of the paired reading cycle. He had just returned to school before the second assessment was conducted and was extremely nervous and self-conscious. In this case, external factors ought to be considered when analysing data.
  • The most vulnerable students improved the most according to test results which would indicate that those who need the programme most certainly do benefit from it.
 

Some improvements include students making progress from being 2 years behind the average reading age to being one year above average, an improvement of 39 months.

 

75% of students improved their reading ability overall ranging from 1 to 39 months.

 
  • In the evaluation, tutees reported they were generally reading more. They stayed on task longer.  Their attitude to reading changed – they enjoyed it particularly when it wasn’t a struggle.
  • Their self-confidence improved visibly. Many of the students reported an improvement in confidence. The programme never became negatively labelled. The profile was very good and it became sought after. They were in no way inhibited or embarrassed about being involved - this was largely due to the positive, committed attitude of the tutors and the teachers. The younger students enjoyed the individual attention and developed good relationships with tutors. They found it to be a very enjoyable programme.
  • The insight by the tutors into teaching was appreciated. The time invested in discussing the importance of confidentiality paid off. No incidents came to our attention. They befriended their tutees and others in the group and it created a great atmosphere in the school. Tutors who had experience of reading difficulties themselves proved to be fantastic tutors. They knew what it felt like and were excited that they could have something to contribute and they gave it life. Indeed, some of them were amazed that they were chosen to be tutors because of their own struggle with reading. They expressed a more positive attitude to reading and came more aware of spelling patterns. They injected their own level of humour into the sessions. Overall, they responded to the responsibility magnificently. One particular tutor was commended in the ceremony for all his hard work and commitment with a SEN student. He went on to do work placement in a primary school and has developed a keen interest in working with students with special needs.
  • Problems 
  • Arose with absences of tutor/tutee
  • Due to the nature of the Transition Year programme, there was a large break in the paired reading intervention at exactly the halfway mark. The result of this was that after the first three weeks of the programme, there was a three week break before the final 3 weeks of the paired reading programme were able to be continued. This was very disruptive to the progress of students as according to research by NEP’s, short intensive bursts are most effective for students. Completing 6 sessions over a 9 week programme was not conducive to intense, continuous learning opportunities.
 

Developments/Recommendations 

 
  • More staff involvement could be explored, particularly the first year class teachers. Involvement of more teachers, if possible, would ease supervision and spread the work load. There is a significant amount of administration and organisation required in running such an intervention so it would be hugely beneficial if there were more teachers involved.
  • Completion of a book report by all first year students was introduced this year by all first year English teachers. Students were allowed to read a book of their choice for one class per week for a six week period outside of the paired reading scheme. Students then compiled a book report and presented this orally in class. The result of this is that all students in first year were afforded time to develop their reading, writing and oral literacy skills even if they were not invited to participate in the paired reading programme. This was highly successful and would be hugely beneficial to students going forward.
  • There are paired reading in primary schools - and the schemes could be linked - through the home school community liaison or as part of the transition from primary to post primary programme.
  • Prize giving would be very motivating and is possibly something that could be explored. This could be run in conjunction with the positive log competition for junior cycle students.
  • We may need to consider how we choose students for involvement as tutees. It might be worth considering the inclusion of all students who have English as a second language. We need to decide whether it is on reading age alone that students are included or for a variety of reasons.ie SEN or social/emotional needs. In an ideal world the programme would be run with all fourth and first years being involved. This might alleviate supervision issues.
   

Tutors

 
  •  While there were some issues with a small number of tutors, overall they were very capable and took the programme very serious and were acutely aware of the welfare of their tutee. From the beginning they enjoyed the status of being tutor and could be heard telling fellow students or teachers of their role. A number of students would have excelled in their dealings with their tutee, promoting confidence and reading strategies and demonstrating a degree of maturity and awareness that is admired here at De La Salle.
 

 Staff

 
  • The teachers were hugely supportive with some volunteering to grade assessments and draw graphs to illustrate the data. Thank you to all involved. Particular thanks to the SEN department who worked closely with us on this intervention.
 

Management

 

A special mention must be made to the Management team who supported the project from the very beginning. Most notably the timetabling of first years with fourth years made running the project a lot easier. Thank you for your support and encouragement throughout.

 

Nicola Crowley

 

Literacy Coordinator

  

Attached appendix of graphs illustrating data from the literacy intervention

 


  

Paired reading data 2016/2017

 

 

 

 

 

4. Summary of school self-evaluation findings

 

4.1 Our school has strengths in the following areas:

 
  • The school is performing above national norms with regard to English in the state certificate examinations.
  • Many Junior Cert students perform well above average in relation to Literacy.
  

4.2 The following areas are prioritised for improvement:

 

We propose to roll out a paired reading programme with the target second year group, with the help of the current transition year group. 

 

N.B. This was reviewed following the review of the first year 2015 group. The literacy team decided to prioritise the 2015 first years in the paired reading programme based on need and age group.  Originally as part of SSE, we carried out the data analysis in 2013/2014 and didn’t consider in the incoming first year group of 2015/2016. From a general perspective they appear to be a good group with approx 73% are on par/above their suggested reading age. However on closer examination there is a significant need. See data from 2015/2016 SSE literacy policy.

  

We will continue to implement a paired reading programme for all incoming first year students with an aim to increase the number of students in our school who are performing at or above average.

   

We envisage an overall improvement in reading age from both groups of first years and fourth years. We are planning on carrying out the intervention in 2017/2018 and we will liaise with the transition year coordinator in the planning process. We would also like to assess the fourth year students who complete the paired reading programme. Although they are not the target group it may be beneficial to assess whether or not the intervention is mutually beneficial.

 

Spelling ability of all classes. This will be assessed at the end of the programme by all subject teachers in their classes, by means of a spelling test. This will determine if there has been an improvement in spelling.

 

Ensure mistakes are being picked up in students' work across all subjects: One strategy we've used to improve student literacy is asking all departments to mark writing for accuracy. Teachers were reminded and asked to highlight mistakes in work they marked, irrespective of the subject e.g. spelling and punctuation.  The idea behind the approach is to flag how important accuracy is and make the point that clarity in writing will improve students' grades across all subjects. All teachers will help to raise awareness of the importance of literacy through marking for accuracy, making literacy every teacher’s responsibility.

    

 

 

 

 

5.  De La Salle College Macroom

 

School Improvement Plan for Literacy

 

 

 
Summary of main strengths as identified in last SSE in Dec 2014:
  • The State Examinations Results for J.C.H.L. English were compared to the results achieved in DLS in 2013 and it was found that the school is performing above national norms with regard to English in the state certificate examinations(National average for Higher Level take up was 72.4% and in DLS we had 87.5%).
  • Many Junior Cert students perform well above average in relation to Literacy.
Note: we have since reviewed the target group in light of the data presented by the SEN team on 2015 first year group.
Summary of main areas requiring improvement as identified in last SSE in Dec 2014:
We propose to roll out a paired reading programme with the target second year group with the help of the current transition year group.
Note: we have since reviewed the target group in light of the data presented by the SEN team on 2015 first year group.
We envisage a 5% overall improvement in reading age from both groups. We are planning on carrying out the intervention in Feb 2016 and we will liaise with the transition year coordinator in the planning process.
Spelling ability of all classes.
All teachers will help to raise awareness of the importance of literacy by reminding the classes of the importance of accuracy in spelling, grammar and punctuation.
Improvement Targets
  • 5% increase in the reading age of the second year target group.
  • 5% increase in the spelling ability of all classes.
Required Actions
  • Targeted paired reading programme
  • Spelling Programme which will include teaching of key word spellings in all subject areas. This initiative will be rolled out for one week. It will involve all subject teachers and all subjects. This can include  a poster campaign, class tests, crosswords, literacy games, spelling maths and a De La Salle Spelling Bee for junior classes.
Persons Responsible
  • Literacy Group
  • Targeted transition year students.
  • Individual subject teachers
Timeframe for action
  • Sept2015-May 2018
Success criteria/measurable outcomes
  • Increase in reading age of target group by 5%.
  • Increase in spelling ability of all pupils within each subject area by 5%.
Review date
  • May 2018
 

 

 

      

 

          

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 
  •  School Self-Evaluation Report for Numeracy
 

Evaluation period: Sept 2014-present

 

 

 

1.Introduction

 

1.1 The focus of the evaluation

 

A school self-evaluation of teaching and learning in De La Salle College was undertaken during the period September 2014 to Dec 2014. During the evaluation, teaching and learning of Numeracy across all subjects was evaluated in both an objective (incoming assessment tests, class test results, and standard numeracy tests) and subjective (teacher observation, peer discussion and student questionnaires) way with focus as follows:

 
  • Numeracy attainment of Junior Cert students.
 

This is a report on the findings of the evaluation.

 

1.2 School context

 

De La Salle College Macroom is a catholic voluntary secondary school dedicated to maintaining the spiritual and educational values of Jean Baptiste de la Salle, the Patron Saint of teachers and founder of the De la Salle order. Currently the school caters for 320 students which include a number of students with special needs as well as students whose native language is not English.

 

The location of the school, in a quiet area away from the noise and bustle of the streets, leads to an atmosphere of peace and tranquillity that is conducive to effective learning. We had a WSE in September 2007.

 

The staff have broken up into three working groups.i.e. Literacy, Numeracy and Homework. We have tried to keep a broad subject representation within each group. Each group was responsible for evaluating the strengths and weaknesses within their area, estimating a base line from which all progress will be measured, bringing areas in need of improvement and future targets to the whole staff in order to get them signed off on and driving the improvement process in their area.

 

2. The findings

 

2015/16

 
  •  60% of pupils fell below 'concern grade' for age group in standard numeracy test.
  
  •  50% of pupils surveyed showed to actively like maths.
  • Pupil survey showed 70% of pupils tested think maths is important outside of school.
  
  •  Average grades (class tests)  for 5 subjects with a mathematical component in junior certificate, Maths, Business, Geography, Science and technology were reviewed. These were compared to national average and were on target.
  

2016/17

 
  • First year students completed a standard mathematical skills test in May 2016. The results of the skills test established that 46% of students fell below the average mark.
  • The skills test identified that 28% of students in the year group required intervention to improve their numeracy.
  

3. Progress made on previously-identified targets improvement targets

 

2015/2016

 
  • Many class rooms have been greatly improved by creating a numeracy rich environment. Maths related posters were also displayed outside of the classrooms, on corridors and walls all over the school.There is some frustration however in the fact that we have to take all the posters down in most rooms at the end of each room as the rooms are needed for exam centres.
  • The feedback from first year parents on the hand book we created to help them help their children with homework was very positive.
  • Exam results suggested that the first years have a good knowledge of basic mathematical operations.
  • Most teachers agreed that limiting the pupils use of the calculator improved their ability to do mental arithmetic.
  • Most  teachers agreed that giving out the results in fraction form instead of percentage form allowed the pupils an opportunity to focus on numeracy in a subject that they would not normally associate with numeracy. This proved to be a good starting point for teachers to introduce areas of their subject that needed a proficiency in numeracy, thus showing the students where maths is relevant in the world around them. This practice should be further developed as we progress with this numeracy plan.
  • Overall it was felt that the pupils opinion of maths related subjects was positive and our overall aim of increasing their likeability of the subject by 5% seems well within grasp.
 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

2016/17

 

Introduction

 
  • Having seen the success of the paired reading programme in 2015/16, it was decided that a paired maths programme would be piloted for the present first year group. Fourth year students were selected to act as tutors.
  • Further analysis was needed to identify the areas of maths that required most attention and the students that required most attention. A further skills test was prepared and students who were in the 28% group in May 2016 were retested in December 2016. The topics in the skills test in December 2016 were similar to those tested in May 2016. The results of the December 2016 skills test showed that 76% of the students had improved and the mean percentage improvement was 4.4%.
  • Based on the various results recorded in the skills tests carried out in May 2016 and December 2016 together with discussion with subject teachers, a total of 17 students were selected to take part in the paired maths programme. The full support of the parents/guardian of each student was given to allow students participate in the programme.
  • It was decided that the following topics would be covered in the paired maths programme:-
  • Order of Operations
  • Natural Numbers
  • Integers,
  • Fractions and
  • Decimals
  •  
  • with an emphasis on the basic operations of addition, subtraction, multiplication and division, without the use of a calculator. This would ensure that the topics tested in May 2016 and December 2016 would be improved, while also attempting to improve new concepts introduced in the first half of first year.
  • Following research that was carried out from May 2016 to December 2016, a paired maths programme was introduced in January 2017.  It was decided that the format of the programme would be as follows:
  • A six week programme
  • One 40 minute session, each week taking place on a Tuesday at 1:50pm in room 6.
 

The paired maths programme is part of our School Self Evaluation for numeracy.

  

Objectives:

 
  • Develop a model of best practice in the planning, designing and implementation of the paired maths programme.
  • Improve numeracy levels among students and enhance and expand their understanding of mathematics.
  •  Investigate the effectiveness of paired maths programmes in developing more positive attitudes towards numeracy and maths among both first and fourth year students.
  • To promote social and personal development for all students involved.
  

Selection of first year students:

 

First year students were selected based on the information outlined in the findings section for 2016/17. A brief summary of the selection process is as follows:

 
  • Mathematical skills test in May 2016
  • Mathematical skills test in December 2016
  • Review of topic based class results
  • Discussion with subject teachers
 

 

 

Selection of fourth year students to act as tutors:

 

The selection of fourth year students was limited to those not involved with the drama programme which was taking place at the same times as the paired maths programme. Although this did not have an impact on the effectiveness of the programme, some fourth year students who expressed interest in acting as a tutor, did not have the opportunity to take part.

 

18 fourth years were selected to be tutors. This group was comprised of 9 higher level students and 9 ordinary level students. The paired maths committee decided that, although the mathematical objectives of the programme were tailored towards improving the basic skills of the first year students, all fourth years, both higher and ordinary, would also greatly benefit from the programme, from a mathematical and social development perspective.

  

Preparing Tutors

 

Before commencing the programme, the paired maths committee met with the fourth year students to outline their roles and responsibilities as tutors. They were given guidelines for the best approach in assisting the first year students, which included the following areas of focus:

 
  • Patience
  • Encouragement
  • Discussion and questioning as areas of focus
 

It was emphasised that fourth years students were to act only as facilitators and provide guidance and that the responsibility for completing the tasks remained with the first years students.

 

Confidentiality was highlighted to all fourth year students as paramount to the success of the programme to ensure that all students involved could take part in the programme in a safe environment that would not be discussed in the general population of the school.

 

A member of the paired maths committee met with the fourth year tutors every Friday throughout the six week programme, in order to review the upcoming topics. A revision worksheet was given to each fourth year student to review over the weekend. This was followed up with another meeting each Monday to review any issues or problems they might have had with the particular topic for that week’s session.

  

Key Findings

  
  • The mean result of the pre-test was 53.18% while the mean result after the paired maths programme was 62.76%, showing a mean increase of 9.58%.
  • 100% of 1st year students said they found the programme helpful and that they would recommend the programme to any incoming first year student who had difficulties with maths.
  • The atmosphere created in the classroom was fantastic with both 1st and 4th years committing to the programme. Teachers who were not members of the paired maths programme also got the opportunity to observe this dynamic and were very impressed with the attitudes of all involved.
  • The social and personal development aspects of our objectives were also met, with clear positive interactions between tutors and 1st year students. As they became more comfortable in their new roles, the amount of work they completed increased. This was simply measured by the amount of activities that were given each day.
  • The tutors were excellent throughout and there was no evidence of any incidents in relation to breaches of confidentiality. It was clear from the regular meetings with the tutors that the programme also refreshed and enhanced their understanding of the basic skills of mathematics, particularly for the tutors currently in ordinary level maths. Through explanations their mathematical literacy also improved.
   

Series1: Results before paired maths programme.

 

Series2: Results after paired maths programme.

  

Problems Encountered

 
  • Absenteeism caused problems in relation to continuity of content and relationship development. This was particularly evident in the results obtained by one first year who missed 2 classes (1 third of the programme).  Also, when tutors were missing, first year students were paired with a new tutor, requiring the development of new relationships, requiring more time that was already limited.
  • Some tutors, particularly those taking ordinary level maths, found the mathematical content quite difficult at times, as it had been 3 yrs since they encountered these topics without the use of calculators. Although the refresher meeting did help, they still encountered problems.
  • As with all classes, there was still great diversity and each student and tutor completed their tasks in different time periods, resulting in an overlap into the next session in some cases.
 

 

 

Recommendations

 
  • Some of the problems outlined are time related issues. Although there was great success achieved in 6 sessions, the committee feels that any increase in the number of sessions would be greatly beneficial. It would reduce the impact of absenteeism and allow more time to accommodate the great diversity that exists within the group. Increasing the time may also allow a greater number of tutors to be involved.
  • A number of fourth years who expressed an interest in the paired maths programme could not be involved as they were taking part in the drama which was operating at the same time. With this in mind we should explore the possibilities of arranging the paired maths programme at a different time of the year.
  • If the paired maths programme ran in the first term it would avoid complications with the drama, promoting more involvement of fourth years. It would also allow us to develop students identified as in need of attention at an earlier stage in first year, avoiding them falling further behind, losing confidence and losing interest in maths.
  • More time needs to be allocated to the preparation of the tutors. Although they understood their roles and responsibilities, they needed more classes on the content, to make them more proficient before tutoring the first years. This could be carried out at the same time and same venue in the weeks leading up to the start of the programme.
   

2017/2018

 

Introduction

 
  • Following the success of the paired maths programme in 2016/2017 the programme was continued into 2017/2018 with some of the recommendations implemented to try and improve the programme and its effectiveness in enhancing students’ mathematical ability.
  • The numeracy committee, with the input of 1st year maths teachers agreed that bringing the programme forward to the second term (October to Christmas) would be more beneficial to the students and more successful in identifying and improving problem areas. By identifying these issues at an earlier stage in first year, the students would have a stronger platform to proceed into the more difficult areas of the course with a greater understanding and greater confidence in their ability.
  • Changing the programme to the second term also allowed the committee to use the October midterm results along with the mathematical skills test taken in May 2017 to select the students to take part in the programme.
  • Changing the programme to the second term allowed the committee to use a retest in December and the Christmas exams to analyse the effectiveness of the programme through two sets of results.
  • Diversity in learning abilities was also taken into consideration when planning the programme with a greater number of resources available to all students over the course of the six week programme.
 

Selecting first year students

 
  • The results of the mathematical skills test showed that 11 students fell below the average mark and these students were invited to take part in the programme with the permission of their parents.
 

 

 

 

 

Key Findings

 
  • The mean result of the selected 1st years for the pre-test (midterm exam) was 55.9% while the mean result after the six week programme was 76.4% which is an average increase of 20.5%. The mean result for the Christmas exam was 63% which is an average increase of 7.1% from the midterm exam.
  • Feedback from first year maths teachers was very positive stating that those students involved in the programme had shown signs of improvement both mathematically, socially and also showed greater confidence in their abilities.
  • Fourth year students displayed great characteristics in their one on one interaction. They were patient, friendly, knowledgeable and they made the first year students feel at ease and comfortable in the paired maths environment.
  • Changing the programme to the second term was a success in improving the students’ ability and preventing them from losing confidence in their ability in the subject.
 

 

 

 

Series 1: Midterm Results

 

Series 2: Post programme results

 

Series 3: Christmas Results

 

4. Summary of school self-evaluation findings

 

4.1  Our school has strengths in the following areas:

 
  • 50% of first year students like maths and 70% of first year students think maths is important outside of school
  • There is an awareness of numeracy among staff and all staff members are engaged in promoting numeracy through their subject areas.
 

All staff members are aware that numeracy is not just about maths and they try to relate numeracy to real life situations.

 

4.2 The following areas are prioritised for improvement:

 

Improve the average grade for subjects with a mathematical component from 58% to 63%.

 

Creating a numeracy rich environment

 

Ensuring that first year students understand the language used in textbook, in particular terms.

 

Ensuring that students have a good knowledge of basic operations such as estimating and finding a percentage and do not rely on calculators.

 

To help first year students recognise and become more proficient with mathematical applications in all subjects which have a mathematical component.

 

To help students see the relevance of maths to their everyday lives outside the classroom. This can be done by highlighting examples of where you use maths in the real world on a daily basis. This in turn should  help to improve the overall levels of Numeracy within the school.

  

 

 

 

 

4.3      The following areas are prioritised for improvement for 2017/18

 
  • Increase the average grade from 63% to 68%.
  • Increase the number of 1st year students continuing into higher level maths, from 77% to 82%.
 

4.4     The following areas are prioritised for improvement for 2018/19

 
  • Increase the average grade from 68% to 70%.
  • Increase the number of 1st year students continuing into higher level maths, from 84% to 85%.
  • Increase the library of numeracy resources in all subjects.
 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

5.  De La Salle College Macroom

 

School Improvement Plan for Numeracy

 
Summary of main strengths as identified in last SSE in Dec 2014:
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
2016/17
 
 
 
2017/2018
  • 50% of first year students like maths and 70% of first year students believe maths is important in the real world outside of school.
  • There is an awareness of numeracy among staff and all staff members are engaged in promoting numeracy through their subject areas.
  • All staff members are aware that making numeracy relevant to the lives of the students is not the sole responsibility of the maths teachers and try to relate numeracy to real life situations within their subject area. Examples of this can be seen in the individual subject department files.
  •  
  • The six week paired maths programme was successful in achieving previously set out targets.
  •  
  • The paired maths programme was successful in improving students understanding and mathematical ability. There was an average increase of 20.5% after the paired maths programme and an average increase of 7.1% from midterm to Christmas which is an overall improvement from 2016/2017.
 
  • 84% of current second years are taking higher level maths which has exceeded our target of 82% set out for this year.
 
  • Through the use of technology our maths department has greatly improved our ability to share resources and collaborate on best teaching practice which in turn has exposed students to a variety of teaching methodologies and resources, thus increasing their understanding of mathematical concepts.
 
Summary of main areas requiring improvement as identified in last SSE in Dec 2014:
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
2016-2018
Improve the average grade for subjects with a mathematical component from 58% to 63%.
Creating a numeracy rich environment.
Ensuring that first year students understand the language used in textbook, in particular terms.
Improve student’s ability to perform mental arithmetic within the areas of estimating and finding a percentage etc, which in turn will lessen their reliance on the use of calculators.
To help first year students recognise and become more proficient with mathematical applications in all subjects which have a mathematical component.
To help students see the relevance of maths to their everyday lives outside the classroom. This can be done by highlighting examples of where you use maths in the real world on a daily basis. This in turn should help to improve the overall levels of Numeracy within the school.
To emphasise the importance of a numeracy rich environment with all classrooms having visible examples for the students.
To promote the sharing of numeracy resources within subject departments.
 
Improvement Targets:
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Improvement Targets for  2017/18
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Improvement targets for 2018/19
Target 1
Increase the average grade for subjects with a mathematical component from 58% to 63%
Target 2
To increase the students positive perception of their mathematical ability from 50% to 55% and nurture their overall love of the subject.
Target 3
To improve the students ability to perform basic mathematical operations, e.g. estimation in other subjects.
  • Target 1
  • Increase the average grade from 63% to 68%.
  • Target 2
  • Increase the number of first years continuing into higher level from 77% to 82%.
  • . Target 1
  • Increase the average first year grade to 70%.
  • Target 2
  • To increase the number of 1st year students continuing into higher level 2nd year maths to 85%
  • Target 3
  • To expand our mathematics library of resources on One Drive and to encourage to use of these resources in class.
  • Target 4
  • To develop a numeracy folder for all subjects on one drive to encourage teachers of all subjects to upload useful numeracy resources that can be applied to their subject
Required Actions
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Required actions for 2017/18
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Required actions for 2018/19
Strategies for Improvement 
Target 1
1. A definition of numeracy will be provided to each staff member. This will form part of their subject plan.

2. Each staff member with the help of their students will explore where numeracy occurs in their subject area.
3. Staff members will provide an explanation for mathematical operations and encourage the use of estimation where possible, limiting the use of calculators etc.

Target 2
1. When appropriates students will be made feel good about the work they do and the efforts they make. Constructive feedback will be given regarding homework.

2. Students will be helped to see the use of numeracy in other subject areas – e.g. measuring in Geography, weighing in Science etc.

3. Maths teachers in particular will endeavour to build the students’ self-esteem in the area of Maths and Numeracy through positive reinforcement and differentiated questioning strategies.

Target 3
1. Students will be encouraged to estimate answers before using a calculator.

2. When returning results of tests to students in all subject areas, a mark out of a total will be given. The student will be helped to work out the percentage themselves.
3. A handbook of ‘first year maths for parents’ will be developed and given to the parents in order to enable them to better help the students with their homework.

Target 1 and 2
 
  • All previous strategies for improvement outlined above will continue to be implemented.
  • Teachers will collaborate on best practice and areas of difficulty for first year students transitioning from primary to secondary school.
  • All teachers will strive to have elements of numeracy included in their subject area including visible resources showing the relevance of numeracy in that subject.
  • Continue paired maths programme
  • Collaborate with all subject departments and set up numeracy folder of subject specific numeracy resources.
Persons Responsible
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
2016-18
  • The Numeracy team will be responsible for encouraging all staff to take responsibility for improving numeracy within the school and their subject. They will collect the data in the same way as above and analyse in May 2016.
  • All staff members will be responsible for developing strategies within their own subject area for the purpose of achieving numeracy targets within that subject area as well as the broader numeracy targets. Such strategies can be seen in the individual subject department files. Teachers will provide feedback on the implementation of the targets throughout the year.
  • Going forward the numeracy team will maintain responsibility for encouraging all teachers in the school to promote numeracy within the school.
  • The numeracy committee will also continue the development and implementation of a successful paired maths programme.
  • The numeracy committee will work with the different subject departments to develop a library of numeracy rich resources relevant to their subjects.
Timeframe for action
Sept 2015 – June 2018
Success criteria/measurable outcomes
  • Increase test scores in subjects with a Mathematical component by 5%.
  • Increase the percentage of pupils in the school who have a positive opinion about Maths by 5%.
  • To improve the pupils ability to perform basic mathematical operations.
  • To improve pupils ability to recognise when to use appropriate mathematical operations within everyday life situations.
  • To show the students how relevant Numeracy is to their everyday lives, which in turn will motivate them to improve their numeracy skills and improve numeracy levels within the school in general.
  • To improve the percentage of students continuing into higher level maths.

 
Review dates
 May 2018 and annually thereafter.
 

 

   

 

 

 

 

 

 

(C) School Self-Evaluation Report

 

Homework and Assessment

 

 

 

                  Evaluation period : Sept 2014-June 2018

 

                  Updated June 2016 

 

                  Updated May 2017

 

 

 

*2016 amendments in italics

 

*2017 amendments in red

 

School Self-Evaluation Report

 

1.Introduction

 

1.1 The focus of the evaluation

 

A school self-evaluation of teaching and learning in De La Salle College was undertaken during the period September 2014 to Dec 2014. During the evaluation, the compliance with Homework policy across all subjects was evaluated with focus as follows:

 
  • Homework compliance in the First Year group
 

This is a report on the findings of the evaluation.

 
  • In June 2016, in the light of findings of the WSE of that year, we have expanded this report to include changes we plan to make to assessment procedures in Transition Year. 
  • In May 2017 we have evaluated the success of the implementation of a new form of continuous assessment introduced in TY in the academic year 2016/2017. 
 

1.2  School context

 

De La Salle College Macroom is a Catholic voluntary secondary school dedicated to maintaining the spiritual and educational values of Jean Baptiste de la Salle, the Patron Saint of teachers and founder of the De la Salle order. Even though the brothers no longer have an active role in the school, we remain committed to achievement in the academic, sporting and development spheres of life as begun by them in Macroom in 1933. The order relinquished control in 1991, however the school remains part of the De la Salle family of schools.

 

Currently the school caters for 320 students which include a number of students with special needs as well as students whose native language is not English.

 

The location of the school, in a quiet area away from the noise and bustle of the streets, leads to an atmosphere of peace and tranquillity that is conducive to effective learning. We had a WSE in September 2007.

 

The staff formed three working groups. Literacy, Numeracy and  Homework. We have tried to keep a broad  subject representation within each group. Each group was responsible for evaluating the strengths and weaknesses within their area, estimating a base line from which all progress will be measured, bringing areas in need of improvement and future targets to the whole staff in order to get them signed off on and driving the improvement process in their area.

 

2. The findings

 

Our findings are based on the analysis of three surveys which we compiled and distributed to the three groups concerned, First Year  students, teachers and the target group parents.

 

We gleaned from the parent’s survey that 93% of parents felt that the amount and level of difficulty of the homework set was of an appropriate level and felt that their sons were participating actively in their homework.

 

Through the teachers survey we learned that 57% of teachers felt that the students were not recording homework properly in their journals. The general opinion was that written homework was being recorded effectively but that learning/reading homework was not being recorded as widely as would be ideal and therefore that aspect of homework could be improved.

 

We discovered through the student survey that 43% of students experienced some level of difficulty in organising their books and copies between the locker, their schoolbag, school and home.

 

Some of these students have already been identified through the SEN Department, and were in receipt of extra assistance through the SNA system but others had not come to the attention of staff initially so the findings were extremely useful with regard to those students.

 

As a result of discussions with the inspectorate during the course of our WSE we identified areas of assessment that could be brought into line with National best practice. Students can be assessed in ways other than the current end of term exams.

 

In the academic year 2016/2017 we implemented a programme of continuous assessment in our TY class in response to the findings of the inspectorate during the school’s most recent WSE which suggested that in order to reflect the diversity within each subject area during TY, one terminal exam was not appropriate. 

 

3. Progress made on previously-identified targets improvement targets

 
  • Student’s compliance with recording of homework in their journals increased by 60% as ascertained by a survey of class teachers.
  • Evidence of significant reduction in the number of homework related loggings in the target year group.
  • The plastic folder system is now standard procedure and students are much more organised coming to class with all required materials.
 

The teachers were given the option of using CA in conjunction with a terminal exam. 95% of teachers chose to participate and the findings show that 85% of those were in favour of continuing the practice. The students were also surveyed with 54% against and 46% in favour.

 

 

 
  •  
  

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

4. Summary of school self-evaluation findings

 

4.1  Our school has strengths in the following areas:

   
  • We ascertained that there was a very high compliance rate among our students in the area of homework completion.
 

We noted high parental participation with our Homework policy. 93% of parents surveyed indicated that they deemed the amount and level of difficulty in their child’s homework to be reasonable.

  

There was a positive collegial approach across the spectrum of subjects offered with regard to the setting and assessment of homework to ensure relative uniformity in terms of volume.

  

We continue to operate an early detection system where potential students of concern are identified and appropriate supports put in place to assist them to comply with our policy. When surveyed, 43% of students said they had trouble organising books, copies etc. for homework.

  

Our Transition Year Programme provides students with the opportunity to interact with a very broad range of activities and subjects and they grow academically, socially and personally during that year.

 

 

 

In response to a detailed survey teachers found that in general terms, the use of CA helped student’s maintain focus throughout the year rather than a cramming for exams situation. It also rewarded students for achievements that were outside of the gambit of traditional academics. The student response is less enthusiastic but that is something we would hope to improve going forward. It is anticipated that as student’s progress through the new JC they will be more familiar with CBA,s project work etc and therefore the fear factor around CA will dissipate.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Following areas are prioritised for improvement:

 

 

 

We propose to develop our specific targeting of students in difficulty through the use of the SNA system.

 

We envisage a renewed emphasis on learned homework as opposed to written. Teachers surveyed felt that 87% of students were not using the Homework Journal appropriately to record non-written work. We aim to reduce that to 30%.Students to record all of their homework in the journal (written and learning)

  

Reduce the instances of academic loggings for non-compliance with homework policy

  

We will have all first year students operating a plastic folder system where all of the materials for each subject are stored. Class teachers to check journals regularly

  

Contact with parent/guardian of students identified as vulnerable on an ongoing basis.

  

Survey of teachers to test levels of compliance with homework policy

  

Subject Teacher/ Class Teacher/ SNA to meet to discuss ongoing progress and strategies.Increase compliance to full use of Homework Journal to 90%

  

Log book entries for Homework infractions to be reduced by 50%

  

Teachers satisfaction with homework compliance to increase by 25% (Determined by survey)

   

100% of first Year students to operate the folder system

   
  • Transition year are to be prioritised to ensure where possible and practical, the assessment is broader and deeper than a classroom based, terminal exam. We want to have the assessment reflect the diversity of learning experiences the students have during the year. 
 

 

 

 

 
  • Parents, students and teachers to collaborate on the types of assessments they would like to see implemented.
 

 

 
  • Reporting and measuring of these assessments to be communicated effectively between all parties. 
  •  
  • Assessment to take the form of projects, continuous assessment, presentations, participation in subject related events etc. or any other form of assessment deemed suitable by the subject teacher.
  •  
  • School management and timetabling of examinations to be flexible in regard to organisation of assessment in the target group. 
  •  
  • Students in Junior school will now be assessed through a broad spectrum of CBAs and project work in line with JC reform and our initiative has prepared the way for that as a more commonly used method of assessment across the school. 
  •  
  • In the academic year 2017/2018 we will seek to roll out CA, in line with JC reform across years 1-4. Years 5 and 6 will be looked at in the following year as more data is gathered
 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

De La Salle College Macroom

 

School Improvement Plan for Homework and Assessment.

 

Sept 2014-2018

 

*2016 amendments in italics

 

*2017 amendments in red – All such amendments relate to Assessment rather than homework as per the recommendations of WSE 2015/16

 

 

 
Summary of main strengths as identified in last SSE in Dec 2014:
  • We ascertained that there was a very high compliance rate among our students in the area of homework completion.
  • We noted high parental participation with our Homework policy. 93% of parents surveyed indicated that they deemed the amount and level of difficulty in their child’s homework to be reasonable.
  • There was a positive collegial approach across the spectrum of subjects offered with regard to the setting and assessment of homework to ensure relative uniformity in terms of volume.
  • We continue to operate an early detection system where potential students of concern are identified and appropriate supports put in place to assist them to comply with our policy. When surveyed, 43% of students said they had trouble organising books, copies etc. for homework.
  • Students are assessed frequently informally and formally throughout the academic year in each subject area. We are now in the process of standardising how such assessment is reported to students and parents.
  • Teachers are 95% compliant with the roll out of CA for TY. And 85% in favour of its introduction across other year groups.
  • Students are 46% in favour and of those that were they believed that CA helped their overall grade.
 
Summary of main areas requiring improvement as identified in last SSE in Dec 2014:
We Students are assessed propose to develop our specific targeting of students in difficulty through the use of the SNA system.
We envisage a renewed emphasis on learned homework as opposed to written. Teachers surveyed felt that 87% of students were not using the Homework Journal appropriately to record non-written work. We aim to reduce that to 50%.
In the 2016 re-evaluation, based on the findings of the WSE of that year we identified the area of assessment as something to be examined.
We acknowledge that our TY Programme could benefit from a broader approach to assessment. 
We will seek to expand the use of CA through the Junior School in the academic year 2017-2018 as subjects come onstream with JC reform. 
We will endeavour to improve student attitude to CA by explaining more fully the rationale and by demonstrating to them the academic benefit of such a programme. We will survey the students again at the end of the year to evaluate their response.
We believe the student response will be more positive given that the TY group of 2017/18 will have done JC English in its new format and therefore will be more familiar with the process
Improvement Targets
  • Students to record all of their homework in the journal (written and learning)
  • Reduce the instances of academic loggings for non-compliance with homework policy
  • We will have all first year students operating a plastic folder system where all of the materials for each subject are stored.
  • We would like to see at least a 25% take up of the introduction of a broader approach to assessment in Fourth Year
  • We want to change the way we assess in some subject areas.
  • We want to communicate that change to the students and parents through the report card system and parent teacher meetings.
  • We want students to assess and report back how they learn from new assessment methods
  • We want all students in Junior school and TY to have access to CA across a variety of subject areas.
  • We want students to be positive and enthusiastic about the benefits of CA
  • We want parents to be informed of their son’s progress in the broader sense than strictly on their performance in one terminal exam
Required Actions
  • Class teachers to check journals regularly
  • Contact with parent/guardian of students identified as vulnerable on an ongoing basis.
  • Survey of teachers to test levels of compliance with homework policy
  • Subject Teacher/ Class Teacher/ SNA to meet to discuss ongoing progress and strategies.
  • Survey students at the end of the year to ascertain their thoughts on the new assessment procedures.
  • Survey teachers at the beginning and the end of the year to determine what methods they were willing to implement and then to seek their professional evaluation of same. 
  • Implemetation of the recording of CA in conjunction with terminal exams using the VSware system
  • Subject dept agreement regarding allocation of marks for CA as well as drawing up specific targets and marking schemes of such to ensure uniformity of assessement.
  • Teachers of subjects previously rolled out as part of JC reform to collaborate with the newly onstream subjects to offer collegial support and advice.
Persons Responsible
  • Homework Group
  • Special Needs Assistants
  • Individual subject teachers
  • Parents
Timeframe for action
  • Sept 2015-May 2016
  • Sept 2016 – May 2017
  • Sept 2017-May 2018
Success criteria/measurable outcomes
  • Increase compliance to full use of Homework Journal to 90%
  • Log book entries for Homework infractions to be reduced by 50%
  • Teachers satisfaction with homework compliance to increase by 25% (Determined by survey)
  • 100% of first Year students to operate the folder system.
  • 25% of teaching staff implement new assessment procedures. 
  • Measure student’s assessment of the success of the project through a survey.
  • Measure teacher’s assessment of the success of the project through a survey and group discussion. 
  • Measure the teacher compliance with CA implementation across Junior School and TY through use of VS Ware
  • Survey parents to ascertain their view on CA as they experience it in terms of reports and parent/teacher meetings.
  • Measure student’s assessment of the success of the project through a survey.
  • Measure teacher’s assessment of the success of the project through a survey and group discussion. 
  •  
Review dates
  • May 2017
  • May 2018
 

 

                  

(D) School Self-Evaluation Report Phase 2

 

Learning Intentions and Success Criteria

 

Evaluation period 2017/2018

   

De La Salle

 

Our Self-Evaluation Report and Improvement Plan

 

1. Introduction

 

This document records the outcomes of our last improvement plan, the findings of this self-evaluation, and our current improvement plan, including targets and the actions we will implement to meet the targets.

 

 

 
  • Outcomes of our last improvement plan 
 

Beginning of new cycle.

  

1.2       The focus of this evaluation

 

We undertook self-evaluation of teaching and learning during the period September 2017 to June 2018. We evaluated the following aspect(s) of teaching and learning:

 
  • Students’ motivation to learn and students’ engagement in the classroom.
  • Teachers’ planning, preparation and assessment of students’ learning.
 

2. Findings

 

In order to research the effectiveness of teaching and learning within the school, we carried out surveys amongst teachers, students and parents, reflecting on engagement and motivation within the classroom.

 

 

 

2.1 This is effective / very effective practice in our school 

  
  • Surveys carried out found that 70% of students in our school feel they are making progress in their learning.
  • Over 50% of parents felt their son was given guidance by teachers on how to improve their learning.
  • 62% of teachers feel that they clearly inform students of the learning intentions of a lesson so that students are focused and motivated to learn.
 

 

 

2.2. This is how we know 

 

 

 
  • Teacher surveys
  • Student surveys
  • Parent surveys
  • Oral feedback from teachers and students
 

 

 

2.3 This is what we are going to focus on to improve our practice further

 

Upon examining and evaluating the surveys given to parents, teachers and students, the following points were identified as areas of improvement.

 
  • Learning Intentions
  • Success Criteria
  

3. Our improvement plan

 

On the next page we have recorded:

 
  • The targets for improvement we have set
  • The actions we will implement to achieve these
  • Who is responsible for implementing, monitoring and reviewing our improvement plan
  • How we will measure progress and check outcomes (criteria for success)
 

As we implement our improvement plan we will record:

 
  • The progress made, and adjustments made, and when
  • Achievement of targets (original and modified), and when
  


 

Our Improvement Plan

 

Timeframe of this improvement plan is from 2018 to 

  
Targets
Actions
Persons / groups responsible
Criteria for success
Progress and adjustments
Targets achieved
Students will be familiar/understand with the concepts learning intentions and success criteria.
Teachers will be reintroduced to the key terminology (learning intentions and success criteria) and provided with guidance on how to implement the strategies in their classroom.
Students will be introduced to these words in guidance class in first year and this will be reinforced in the classroom.
Teachers will seek professional training from the SSE committee and the NCCA.
Guidance teacher/subject teachers.
All teachers/ SSE committee.
Repeat surveys, review results and direct feedback from teachers and students.
Repeat surveys, review of results and direct feedback from teachers and students.
Plan will be re-evaluated in December 2018 to ensure that progress is occurring.
Teachers’ implantation will be reviewed in December 2018 in correlation with student review.
By June 2019, all first years will recognise and utilise learning intentions and success criteria.
By June 2019 all teachers will have received relevant training.
Teachers will effectively refer to success criteria and learning intentions on a regular basis in their classroom.
 

 

 

 

 

 

  

 

 

Appendix to School Self-Evaluation reports: policy checklist (Post-Primary)

  
Policy
Relevant legislation, circulars, guidelines
Has the policy been approved by the Board of Management?
If no, indicate aspects to be developed
Enrolment policy
Section 15(2)(d) of Education Act
Equal Status Acts 2000-2011
Circular M51/93

 Yes


Attendance and participation strategy[1]
   
Circular M51/93
Section 22, Education (Welfare) Act 2000

 Yes


Code of behaviour, including anti-bullying policy[2]
 

Dignity in the Workplace Charter

 
Circular M33/91
NEWB guidelines Developing a Code of Behaviour: Guidelines for Schools
Section 23, Education (Welfare) Act 2000
Equal Status Acts 2000-2011
Anti-bullying Procedures for Primary and Post-primary schools 2013, and Circular 45/13
Section 8(2)(b), Safety, Health and Welfare at Work Act 2005

 Yes

 
Child Protection policy
Circular 0065/2011

 Yes


Annual attendance report to Tusla and Parents’ Association
Section 21, Education (Welfare) Act 2000

 Yes


Health and Safety Statement
Health and Safety Act 2005
Section 20

 Yes


Critical Incident Management policy
Responding to Critical Incidents: Guidelines and Resource Materials, NEPS 2016

 Yes


Data protection
Data Protection Act 1988
Data Protection (Amendment) Act 2003
(DATA Legislation)

 No

In Process
Special educational needs / Inclusion policy[3]
 
Education Act (1998)
Equal Status Acts (2000 to 2011),
Education (Welfare) Act (2000),
Education for Persons with Special Educational Needs Act (EPSEN)[4] (2004)
 

Disability Act (2005))

 

Circular 0014/2017

  

 Yes


Relationships and sexuality education (RSE) policy
Circulars 37/2010, 23/2010, 0027/08

 Yes


Substance use policy
Department of Education and Skills Directive; guidelines issued to schools in 2002

 Yes


Internet acceptable use policy
National Council for Technology in Education (NCTE) Guidelines, 2012 (www.webwise.ie)

 Yes


  




 

 

 

 

 

School updates and School Developments:

 

 

 
  • Engagement in the New Junior Cert :
  • A new Subject called Wellbeing has been introduced to First Years and this will be rolled out to all Junior Cert students as the year’s progress.
  • Teachers have started CBA’s with second and third years in the relevant subject areas.
  • Teachers have started to use their professional time to hold SLAR meetings.
  • All teachers have availed of in service in the area of the new framework for Junior Cert and also subject specific cluster meetings. 
  • Child Protection :
  • All teachers have undertaken the mandatory child protection training for mandated people.
  • The school has undertaken a Safeguarding Risk Assessment and produced a Safeguarding Statement. 
  • KAL House : 
  • KAL House has continued to take on new students and currently has four fulltime pupils. It will take on another two pupils in 2018/2019 and will then have reached full capacity. 
  • SSE :
  • Our first phase of the SSE process is due to finish in June 2018.
  • Literacy and Numeracy will continue to be monitored from a school improvement point of view.
  • A paired maths programme was established in 2016/2017 and runs annually.
  • We set up a working group in 2017/2018 to gather evidence for the first of our areas of focus in the second phase of the SSE process and in the current year 2018/2019 we have entered the first year of implementing learning intentions and success criteria in all classes.
  • Evidence for our second area of focus will be gathered in 2018/2019.
 

 

         

Recent Scholarships:

 

2017- Entrance Scholarship UCc

 

            Kelliher Scholarship UCC

 

2014- Sports Scholarship CIT

 

2013- Sports Scholarship CIT

 

2012- Entrance Scholarship UCC

 

 

 
  • 2012 – Trinity College Cambridge
  • 2011 – Multiple to UCC and CIT
  • 2011 – Student achieved first place in Ireland in Leaving Cert Economics.
  • 2010 & 2009 – J P McManus Scholarship to UL.        
 

 

 

 

 

[1] Under the provisions of the Education (Welfare) Act (2000) (section 22) the school’s attendance strategy should conform to the provisions stipulated.

   

[2] Under the provisions of the Education (Welfare) Act (2000) (section 23) the school’s code of behaviour should conform to the specifications stated.

   

[3] Section 9 of the Education Act (1998) requires a school to “use its available resources” to identify and provide for the educational needs of those “with a disability or other special educational needs.”

   

[4] The EPSEN Act requires that schools be inclusive of and provide an appropriate education for students with special educational needs.

   


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